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Forum LockedWhere 2 o'clock follows 7 o'clock

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Paul View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Where 2 o'clock follows 7 o'clock
    Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 23:59
Thailand is probably unique in the world in being the only country not to use either a 24 hour or 12 hour clock. Using a 6 hour clock for 12 hours and a 7/5 hour clock for the other 12 hours makes telling time in the country 'interesting at best'
 
The system goes back to the old days when each hour was beaten on a drum in villages. There were 2 beats called Tee and Tum, distinguishing between morning and night.
 
With the arrival of western clocks a more formalised 12 hour clock to bring Thailand in line with western countries was introduced called 'mong' chimes. Each chime was given a times of day ie: morning, afternoon, evening and night. Creating a western style: '1 at night', 4 in the afternoon' and so on....
 
Thais were unwilling to abandon Tee and Tum and introduce the new system fully so what grew was a hybred of both systems.
 
Thai time works tike this..... translation are literal.
 
1am - tee neung - beat 1
2am - tee song - beat 2
3am - tee sam  - beat 3
4am - tee see - beat 4
5am - tee ha - beat 5
6am - hok mong chow - 6 chimes in the morning
7am - jet mong chow - 7 chimes in the morning
8am - song mong - 2 chimes
9am - sam mong - 3 chimes
10am - see mong - 4 chimes
11am - ha mong - 5 chimes
midday - thieng wan - midday
1pm - bai neung mong  - afternoon 1 chime
2pm - bai song mong  - afternoon 2 chimes
3pm - bai sam mong  - afternoon 3 chimes
4pm - see mong yen - 4 chimes evening (or less common, bai see mong  - afternoon 4 chimes
5pm - ha mong yen - 5 chimes evening
6pm - hok mong yen - 6 chimes evening
7pm - neung tum - 1 beat
8pm - song tum - 2 beat
9pm - sam tum - 3 beat
10pm - see tum - 4 beat
11pm - ha tum - 5 beat
Midnight - thieng koon - midnight


Edited by Paul - 20-Nov-2007 at 02:13
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Post Options Post Options   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Dec-2008 at 05:35
old thread..

very interesting... but still i cant comprehend how it works.. does it differentiate from the sounds of the clock? beats and chimes?

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Voskhod Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Dec-2008 at 12:48
very interesting... but still i cant comprehend how it works.. does it differentiate from the sounds of the clock? beats and chimes?


Not quite sure what you mean. In the old days, the drum/gong in the village or temple sounds differently to differentiate between day and night (eg 7 am and 7 pm. Both were indicated by seven beats but sounds differently)

There are other ways to tell the time as well. For example, thieng koon (midnight) is also known as "Song Yahm". Yahm roughly translates to "time of day", originally referring to the division of the day which used to be divided into eight three-hours period. Midnight was the start of the second period in the night hence "song yahm" (two/second yahm). So you'll also have Yahm Nung (9pm) and Sam Yahm (3am) (though neither are in common usage).

From 8am to 11am the system applied to the time from 6 to 7am seems to be more in common use (so 8am would be pad mong chow, 9am kao mong chow, "8 chime and 9 chime respectively) but the other system is also used as well. Also, officially (eg, in government offices, timetables and TV programs) the 24-hour clock is in use. You just have to know there's a lot of ways to say the same time. =P
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Post Options Post Options   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Dec-2008 at 19:49
So three chimes is two bells in the forenoon watch, right?
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Post Options Post Options   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Dec-2008 at 15:49
Originally posted by Voskhod

very interesting... but still i cant comprehend how it works.. does it differentiate from the sounds of the clock? beats and chimes?


Not quite sure what you mean. In the old days, the drum/gong in the village or temple sounds differently to differentiate between day and night (eg 7 am and 7 pm. Both were indicated by seven beats but sounds differently)

There are other ways to tell the time as well. For example, thieng koon (midnight) is also known as "Song Yahm". Yahm roughly translates to "time of day", originally referring to the division of the day which used to be divided into eight three-hours period. Midnight was the start of the second period in the night hence "song yahm" (two/second yahm). So you'll also have Yahm Nung (9pm) and Sam Yahm (3am) (though neither are in common usage).

From 8am to 11am the system applied to the time from 6 to 7am seems to be more in common use (so 8am would be pad mong chow, 9am kao mong chow, "8 chime and 9 chime respectively) but the other system is also used as well. Also, officially (eg, in government offices, timetables and TV programs) the 24-hour clock is in use. You just have to know there's a lot of ways to say the same time. =P


well then.. i still remember in the village.. in North Malaysia.. during solat time, they use some kind of drum.. not a drum actually nor a gong.. it's made of wood.. and it was hang and someone will hit it.. in certain way to indicate prayers time.. i dont think they use it already nowadays..
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