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eaglecap View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Feb-2009 at 23:59
Originally posted by Knights Knights wrote:

I recently bought John Julius Norwich's 'The Middle Sea', a book about the history of the Mediterranean. It's been pretty enjoyable and informative so far.


I have read all of his books about the Byzantine Empire and I like him so I will check this out.

Edited by eaglecap - 28-Feb-2009 at 00:05
Well then, brothers and fellow citizens and soldiers, remember this in order that your memorial, your fame and freedom will be eternal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 07:21
Excellent - yes my friend has read some of his Byzantine work and told me about him and his style. Very 'great-man' and politics related...doesn't focus much on culture, the arts and religion...but still gives a generally fantastic chronological overview. I've read a bit more of the Middle Sea and was a bit disappointed at how fast it went through Classical Greece and such, but I guess, it does have to give a history from the beginning up until the Treaty of Versailles! It's worth a read though, simply because of how vast but concise an overview it gives of the region.

I ducked into a university library today and found an absolutely fantastic book called 'In Defense of Dolphins'. It was a book looking at the behavioural psychology and biology of Dolphins, then applying it to philosophy. The book (of which I only got through a bit) delves into the idea of a 'nonhuman person' and such, using science and real life instances to piece together a proposition that dolphins could be 'nonhuman persons', intelligent, emotional and empathetic. It's not as far fetched as I may have put it, so sorry if you got the wrong impression about it. I of course am not as much concerned with the philosophical dimension of the book, but rather, the science and behavioural psychology of these enigmatic creatures. Smile

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Feb-2009 at 00:07
I put aside "War of a Thousand Deserts" to read



by Robert Spencer an unpopular author by some on here but my freedom to read it.
Well then, brothers and fellow citizens and soldiers, remember this in order that your memorial, your fame and freedom will be eternal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Klaus Fleming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2009 at 21:16
Jonah Goldberg's Liberal Fascism. Interesting book, and while I accept Goldberg's central thesis about the common ancestry of socialism and fascism, I fail to appreciate the convulsed method by which Goldberg argues his case.
The problem is that Goldberg insists on putting the cart before the horse: no ideology that predates Italian fascism can be described as fascist, not even the French right-wing radicalism of the Action Francaise. The AF did become openly fascist in the 1920s, but before that their main ideological influences were Bonapartism (in its Boulangist form) and ancien regime royalism.
Another major problem is Goldberg's inconsistent use of the word 'liberalism'. When I looked at the title of the book I was amazed by Goldberg's lumping together of John Stuart Mill and Benito Mussolini. Mill's liberalism, as many of you will know, is the exact ideological opposite of fascism and socialism. So when I read the book I found out that Goldberg was really talking about progressivism and socialism, not liberalism. Not once does Goldberg refer to John Stuart Mill - and this in a book that supposedly covers liberalism as well as fascism. Goldberg gets around this conundrum by referring to liberalism as 'what we call liberalism'. Who is we? Goldberg and his friends? Republicans? Americans all over? The European reader is left baffled.
Having read the book I understand why Goldberg does not want to tackle John Stuart Mill: establishing a connection between nineteenth-century liberalism and twentieth-century fascism is well nigh impossible. However, by ignoring this central problem in his own thesis Goldberg becomes guilty of academic dishonesty - not the hallmark of a reputable writer.
There are also countless other generalized arguments that would have required more careful qualification, such as the link between the French Revolution and fascism. By labelling the French Revolution as a social experiment carried out by Robespierre Goldberg fails at basic history. Historical events do have a chronology that has to be accounted for. Robespierre DID NOT start or even lead the French Revolution. The Revolution took place in 1789, and it essentially established a constitutional monarchy, not a utopian socialist/proto-fascist regime. The Committee of Public Safety was not established until July 1793, effectively through a Jacobin coup.
Goldberg does hit the nail in the head when he describes the 'war mobilisation' of the American society under Woodrow Wilson and later FDR. It is important that Goldberg made that connection between war and social control. Having tasted authoritarian, even dictatorial powers during war, the progressive US presidents (Wilson and Truman) found it difficult to relinquish that power over every single aspect of the American society. By taking Goldberg's thesis a bit further one could argue that the American society was permanently 'mobilised' in 1945, and that the executive branch has never relinquished the powers that the war gave to it. The fact remains that the size of government in USA is humunguous, and growing each year.
It is very clear that Goldberg's book is a partisan diatribe against the Democrats. Here lies another weakness: the book would have benefited from a closer look at the Republican party and its own continuous love affair with large government, and its yearning for a 'stronger executive power' (Dick Cheney).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12-Mar-2009 at 21:33
Has anyone read this book?
I bought this a few years ago while I was doing a research paper about Athena. I read only portions of it so it is in my growing pile of books I bought and never read or in this case read only part of it. I put all the books in this classification in a big pile and I will read them one by one- LOL


Well then, brothers and fellow citizens and soldiers, remember this in order that your memorial, your fame and freedom will be eternal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Parnell Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2009 at 10:33
I'm reading Walter Scott's 'The Talisman' at the moment. Its hard to break in to his style of writing, since I think he wrote it in the 1820s, but once your over that curve its plain sailing. Interesting book actually, I've always been interested in 'romantic history', as in, historical fiction involving the real characters. Apparantly the Talisman is one of his less well known, I only heard of it through my lecturer who was bitching about it in a crusades lecture. Had to read it after that :-)
"Neither apathy nor antipathy can ever bring out the truth of history" Eoin Mac Neill.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2009 at 19:16
I am rereading


Translated by Robert Fagles
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TheARRGH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2009 at 19:18
Reading the new annotated Dracula, as well as "The Social Contract" by Rousseau.
Who is the great dragon whom the spirit will no longer call lord and god? "Thou shalt" is the name of the great dragon. But the spirit of the lion says, "I will." - Nietzsche

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Parnell Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2009 at 21:24
Since my last post I read the Talisman and also Rob Roy. Very good book Rob Roy. Not nearly as good as Catch 22 though. Only 40 or so pages left, fantastic book, reccomend it to anyone.
"Neither apathy nor antipathy can ever bring out the truth of history" Eoin Mac Neill.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sun Tzu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 14:50
I read a little bit of John Locke and been reading a book on the KGB, Stalin was one paranoid man lol. I never knew Trotsky was killed with an ice pick...wow
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 20:33
Has anyone read "Inside Hitler's Greece?"



I read it a couple of years ago and really suggest reading it.

Funny I have visited the Parthenon several times and stood on those same rocks. I recognized them-

Edited by eaglecap - 02-Apr-2009 at 20:34
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 21:10
I am reading Robert Heinlein's Space Cadet. I love historical science fiction.
I am also reading Jared Diamond's Colapse. An excelent book and a complement to his classic about Germs and Steel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Spartakus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 22:46
I am currently reading "Pride and Prejudice", by Jane Austen.
"There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them. "
--- Joseph Alexandrovitch Brodsky, 1991, Russian-American poet, b. St. Petersburg and exiled 1972 (1940-1996)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2009 at 21:45
I have a copy of "Homer's Daughter" by Robert Graves. I might put the Iliad down and read this first.



n122280.jpg
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bod Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 11:11
I am reading "The Classical World, an epic history of Greece and Rome" by Robin Lane Fox.

I havn't read about Greece or Rome before so I thought it was time to give it a go, I must say I am finding this book very rewarding, a good place to start for a novice in the subject. 

My big problem when reading books on history is that I get distracted by a subject or person in the book, I spend the next week on the internet finding every scrap of information that I can on that subject. At the moment I am trying to find out about Herodotus. It can take me literally months to get through a book when I am unsure of the subject. At the same time my book pile gets bigger and bigger. Smile


Edited by bod - 11-May-2009 at 11:33
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zaitsev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 11:14
Personally I just saw an amazing copy of 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies'. Considering picking that one up.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 12:40
LOL Zaitsev. Let me know how it goes! And what the heck it's about!

I just finished reading Parry's Age of Reconnaissance. Didn't get through the whole thing, before it was due back to the library, unfortunately. Oh well, still proved to be a pretty good read.

Right now, I have to get stuck into some books for a major essay about the relationship between poverty and violence. Suggestions anyone?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kaysaar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 13:07
Originally posted by Zaitsev Zaitsev wrote:

Personally I just saw an amazing copy of 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies'. Considering picking that one up.


I picked up a copy of that, but I haven't had the time to read it yet.

In the past three weeks I've read F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, and The Pigman by Paul Zindel for my ESL classes.

I'm currently reading A Separate Peace by John Knowles - good book so far.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 13:15
The Great Gatsby is an excellent book, flows till the end, and you wonder where the time went. Kind of like the exuberant thirties I guess!

Currently a little project of mine is Jonathan Swift's works, as I have a dedicated module on him next term, and want to get a head start. Despite one of my acquaintances claiming he read Gulliver's Travels at age eight (apparently the Puffin version and the original are the same book), I am finding him pleasantly challenging. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Parnell Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 15:01
In the last couple of days in order to distract myself from studying for my exams whilst providing the illusion that I'm doing something productive, I've read and finished two books. Alduous Huxleys' 'Point Counter Point' (A fantastic book, very funny and deep!) and William Kennedy's 'Ironweed' (Not so good, OK, but a little missing in something)

Probably a sign of things to come this summer. No job + sun = lots of reading. Probably.
"Neither apathy nor antipathy can ever bring out the truth of history" Eoin Mac Neill.
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