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Forum LockedTupac Amaru II

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    Posted: 16-Aug-2007 at 11:39

In the late 60s and early 70s a famous urban guerilla was making an insurrection war in Uruguay. Theirs name was the Tupamaros, chosen in honor of Tupac Amaru II, heroe of the independence of Peru. The Tupamaros were crashed by the Uruguayan intelligence services after a bloody and dirty war that still troubles that country. Tupac Amaru II movement was also crashed in Peru two centuries earlier with equal brutality, but the image of Tupac Amaru still light the fight for freedom and justice in Latin America.

 
 
 
Tupac Amaru II is an heroe in Peru because his fight for independence and the restablishment of the Inca Empire. this is his story.
 
Pinguin
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Túpac Amaru II (b. March 19, 1742 in Tinta, Cusco, Peru – executed in Cusco May 18, 1781) — born José Gabriel Condorcanqui Noguera — was the leader of an indigenous uprising in 1780 against the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire. Although unsuccessful, he later became a mythical figure in the Peruvian struggle for independence and indigenous rights movement and an inspiration to a myriad of causes in Peru. He should not be confused with Tupac Katari who led a similar uprising in the region now called Bolivia at the same time.

The great-grandson of the last Incan leader Túpac Amaru, José Gabriel Condorcanqui was born in Tinta, in the province of Cusco, and received a Jesuit education at the San Francisco de Borja School. In 1760, he married Micaela Bastidas Puyucahua.

Condorcanqui inherited the caciqueship of Tungasuca and Pampamarca from his older brother, governing on behalf of the Spanish governor. But he sympathized with the plight of the native people and petitioned the Spanish government to improve conditions in the textile mills, the mines, and the villages. Unsuccessful, he adopted his great-grandfather's Incan name and a more native style of dress, and organized a rebellion, seizing and executing governor Antonio de Arriaga of Tinta in 1780.

Túpac%20Amaru%20II%20%28José%20Gabriel%20Condorcanqui%29%20was%20initially%20sentenced%20to%20be%20dismembered%20by%20having%20four%20horses%20pull%20out%20his%20limbs,%20an%20action%20they%20were%20not%20able%20to%20accomplish.
Túpac Amaru II (José Gabriel Condorcanqui) was initially sentenced to be dismembered by having four horses pull out his limbs, an action they were not able to accomplish.

Túpac Amaru II's rebellion was the first major uprising against the Spanish colonists in two centuries. It was suppressed after some successes like the Battle of Sangarará and he was soon captured. He was sentenced to witness the execution of his wife, his eldest son Hipólito, his uncle Francisco, his brother-in-law Antonio Bastidas, and some of his captains before his own death. He was sentenced to be tortured and put to death by dismemberment, in which four horses would have to tear apart each limb from his body, one limb tied to each horse. Unable to accomplish this execution, he was later drawn and quartered on the main plaza in Cuzco, in the same place his great-grandfather had been beheaded. When the revolt continued, the Spaniards executed the remainder of his family, except his 12-year-old son Fernando, who had been condemned to die with him, but was instead imprisoned in Spain for the rest of his life. It is not known if any members of the Inca royal family survived this final purge. At the same time, Incan clothing and cultural traditions, and self-identification as "Inca" were outlawed, along with other measures to convert the population to Spanish culture and government, until Peru's independence as a republic.

 
 
"He who attempts to count the stars, not even knowing how to count the knots of the 'quipus'(counting string), ought to be held in derision."

Inca Pachacutec (1438-1471)
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