History Community ~ All Empires Homepage


This is the Archive on WORLD Historia, the old original forum.

 You cannot post here - you can only read.

 

Here is the link to the new forum:

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Forum LockedThe start of something...?

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Knights View Drop Down
Webmaster
Webmaster
Avatar
AE Magazine Coordinator

Joined: 23-Oct-2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 3294
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The start of something...?
    Posted: 16-Feb-2009 at 06:41
Thought I'd give you the heads up on a recent development in the world of zoological science. We might be seeing the first sparks in something big in conservation and ecology.

First Extinct-Animal Clone Created

Charles Q. Choi
for National Geographic News
February 10, 2009
 
An extinct animal has been resurrected by cloning for the first time—though the clone died minutes after birth.

Findings revealed January 23 in the journal Theriogenology describe the use of frozen skin in 2003 to clone a bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, a subspecies of Spanish ibex that went extinct in 2000.

Scientists had cloned endangered species before, but not one that had officially died out.

(Related: "Scientists Clone First Endangered Species: A Wild Sheep" [October 29, 2001].)

Study co-author Jose Folch, of the Center for Agro-Nutrition Research and Technology in Aragon, Spain, said his team plans to try cloning another this ibex this year or next.

"We are not especially disappointed for the death of the cloned newborn," Folch explained in an email, because such deaths in cloning experiments are common.

"We will try to improve the technology in order to increase the efficiency of the cloning process."

But David Wildt, a senior scientist at the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., who did not participate in this study, warned that the successful cloning wouldn't be the first step in creating a real-life Jurassic Park.

"The public should not leap to the conclusion that we are on the edge of cloning woolly mammoths or dinosaurs," he said. "Even if such embryos could be constructed, there are no appropriate surrogate mothers for long-dead species."

Success and Setbacks

For 200 years, hunting had thinned the Pyrenean ibex population, and the last living bucardo died in 2000, hit by a falling branch.

Using frozen skin samples taken from this lone specimen in 1999, Folch and his colleagues made clone embryos by inserting the bucardo's DNA into domestic goat eggs emptied of their original genetic material.

The clones were then implanted into other subspecies of Spanish ibex or goat-ibex hybrids.

If the environment in which an embryo develops is not a close match, problems can occur during pregnancy. Of the 208 embryos the researchers implanted, only seven goats became pregnant, and just one bucardo made it to term.

The newborn bucardo died of respiratory failure immediately after birth. Dissection revealed the animal had lung abnormalities, although all its other organs looked normal.

Such abnormalities are common in cloning—while a clone's DNA might be identical to its donors', the act of shuffling DNA from one cell to another can lead to irregularities during development.

A Step Forward

Smithsonian's Wildt called the work a "highly noteworthy scientific accomplishment."

"Offspring was produced from an animal well known to have suffered a recent extinction."

The bucardo story "is fascinating, because resurrection-by-cloning was the only option," Wildt said.

But there are "vastly more effective and logical approaches" at conserving virtually all living wildlife species, he added, including re-establishing wild habitats, captive breeding by natural means, and artificial insemination.

"The strong recovery of the black-footed ferret and giant panda are two excellent examples" of species that have come back from the brink thanks to conservation efforts, Wildt said.

(Related: "Ferrets Slinking Back From Brink of Extinction in U.S." [August 9, 2007].)

Reproductive biologist Bill Holt at the Zoological Society of London, who did not participate in this study, added that generating just one or a few animals via cloning "will not necessarily produce a viable population that would survive into the future."

Even if all resulting offspring were healthy, he said, the fact that they only have a few genetic samples of the bucardo to work with would mean there would be no genetic diversity in the population, as in inbred groups.

"They would be very susceptible to disease or even climatic change and may not be able to survive for very long."


Back to Top
Justinian View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar
King of Númenor

Joined: 11-Nov-2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1405
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Justinian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Feb-2009 at 06:53
Quite fascinating.  I have not kept pace with cloning since that sheep in the late nineties, (not that I was ever informed in the least) but this is certainly of note.  Cloning extinct animals, perhaps we may yet construct a jurassic park.Wink  I'll admit my curiosity is piqued; it will be interesting to see how this progresses.
"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann

Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Webmaster
Webmaster
Avatar
AE Magazine Coordinator

Joined: 23-Oct-2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 3294
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Feb-2009 at 07:00
It has been my dream since I was 4 to make JP a reality. At this stage, I still can't seem to figure out a plausible (let alone ethical) way of making it happen...but we'll see. Approve I believe a major subject in the extinct animal cloning sphere is the Thylacine, of which they have specimens and DNA samples, possibly allowing us to clone. Best thing is, we have a juvenile specimen in formaldehyde (at least one) which means that unlike Dolly the sheep, the clone won't be nearing death as soon as it's born. 

Back to Top
rider View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar
AE Editor & Pet Platypus

Joined: 09-Aug-2004
Location: Estonia
Status: Offline
Points: 4720
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Feb-2009 at 19:14
What irony?
 
A falling branch killed the last specimen of a species.
There is no emotion, there is peace.
There is no ignorance, there is knowledge.
There is no passion, there is serenity.
There is no chaos, there is harmony.
There is no death, there is the Force.
Back to Top
Dolphin View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar
Níl a fhios agam cad ata ag tharlu

Joined: 06-Feb-2007
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 1554
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Mar-2009 at 23:58
I need this to work. Seriously, I don't think I can live a full life without seeing a horribly arthritic manbearpigasaurous lying in a zoo somewhere! Big smile

Seriously though, this could be an amazing breakthrough if we could develop it fully. It could the genetic heritage of some of our most vulnerable species, which has to be a good thing.



Am not I Dametas? Why, am not I Dametas?
Back to Top
Siege Tower View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 28-Aug-2006
Location: Edmonton,Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 578
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Siege Tower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Mar-2009 at 03:49
This is indeed very interesting. I can hardly wait to get my own pet T-Rex some day.


Edited by Siege Tower - 10-Mar-2009 at 03:50
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.