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Forum LockedThe recipe thread (serious attempt)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dawn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Mar-2006 at 10:34

Not to incourage the Tomato talk  but heres my favorite

Spinach stuffed Tomatoes

6 ripe tomaotes - Roma taste best but any type will do  - tops cut off and hollowed out. fine dice insides and set aside

2 bunches spinich cleaned and stems removed

butter

salt and pepper,nutmeg

1 onion fine diced

parmesean and ementhal cheese

 

saute onion in butter until soft but not colored, add spinich and seasonings ( a little white wine is nice here too) cover and steam untill spinich wilts. 

add tomato insides and stir in cheeses. How much cheese you add depends on how much you like cheese 

stuff mixture into tomato shells and to with some more ementhal . bake in 400 degree oven untill tomato is just soft and cheese is melted ( if the tomato is cooked but the cheese is not melted put under broiler for few moments to finish.

at times I have also added to this some cooked wild rice or very small pasta and cooked bacon making it more of a main course lunch dish than a side dish. 



Edited by Dawn
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gyadu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Mar-2006 at 21:18

Karele aur Baingan ki Sabzi

250 gm opInfo(26)">bitter gourd
250 gm brinjals
1/2 cup oil
1/2 tsp opInfo(183)">mustard seeds
1/2 tsp opInfo(104)">fenugreek seeds
1/2 tsp opInfo(29)">cumin seeds
2 tsp opInfo(238)">salt
1/2 tsp opInfo(320)">turmeric powder
1/2 tsp opInfo(63)">chilli powder
1 tsp amchoor

METHOD

Scrape the rough skin of the bitter gourd and slice them thick. Mix 1 tsp salt into it and keep it for at least 15 minutes. Squeeze out the liquid thus formed.

Dice the brinjals into about 1 1/2 cm cubes.

Heat oil in a heavy-based pan, fry the bitter gourd over high flame, to a light brown.

Remove with a slotted spoon and fry the brinjals in the same oil, also over very high flame till it is tender but retains its shape.

Remove the brinjals and in the same oil add mustard seeds, fenugreek seeds and cumin. When they splutter, add the bitter gourd and brinjals along with salt, turmeric, coriander, chilli powder and amchoor and mix well.

Saute over low flame for about 5 minutes and serve hot.
 
Users Comments
  • useless receip and method too.
    - premchand (rotaline@mtnl.com)

  • rare combination
  • Deadly combination!!!
  • who does nt like the taste of bitterness can taste this one
    - mano

  • this reciepie is really good for health and the diabetic patients can have this ofently
    - manu (manokuty@yahoo.com)

  • The combination of bitter gourd and bringal doesnt work at all.
    - Shama Chhatre

  • Yummyyy---TOo good a combination
    - Maithili (maithili12hy@rediffmail.com)
  • http://www.ndtvcooks.com/recipes/nongrecipe.asp?id=40

     
     
     
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Mar-2006 at 11:41

    Rendang



    Ingredients:
    
    1 tsp shrimp paste
    1 kg rump steak  ( beef/chicken/mutton )
    1 stalk lemon grass
    -----------------------
    1 tsp salt
    1 tbsp sugar
    1 tbsp soya sauce
    ------------------------
    
    3 stalk lemon grass - sliced thinly
    120gms grated coconut - fried and pounded
    
    4 slices galangal
    5 candlenuts           }   Ground
    
    2 tbsp curry power - blended with 2 tbsps
    water
    ------------------------
    30 dried chillies
    120 gms shallots
    4 red chillies
    1 clove garlic
    2 cm piece ginger
    -------------------------
    
    1/2  cup thick coconut milk  - extracted from 1/2 grated coconut
    8 tbsps oil
    
    
    


    Method:

  • Heat oil and fry ground ingredients and curry powder until fragrant
  • Add in half of the coconut milk and fry until the oil separates
  • Add in the soya sauce mixture and steak.
  • Add in also the fried grated coconut and lemon grass. Stir fry for 10 minutes.
  • Pour in the rest of the coconut milk and simmer until the meat is tender, for about 1 hour.
  • Increase heat to reduce gravy until it is thick and oilly.

    Picture:

    * u can eat with rice.. ketupat.. lemang...

       Lemang                      Ketupat

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Mar-2006 at 13:09
    OMG Cahaya....the coconut milk and the curry must give it a great taste! That sounds delicious...yummy!

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Halevi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Mar-2006 at 13:21
    I loooooooooooooove rendang =)       Thx for the recipe, Cahaya.
    "Your country ain't your blood. Remember that." -Santino Corelone
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2006 at 11:21

    the trick on Rendang cooking is.... put into an electric blender and blend all the ingredients with the coconut milk.... and then.. heat up the cooking pan or whtever u gonna use for cooking... pour the blended ingredients together with chicken/beef/mutton.... cook it and leave it till u can see the thing started to change the color to brownish and oil come out from the coconut milk... this time u have to stir once in while... and can add some salt.. tht's it...  wait till dry a little... i have done it and it's easy... it taste great!! try for urself... for aditional ingredients.. can put some of chopped tumeric leafs for better smell...

    If it's hard for u to get coconut milk.. then u can replace it with milk... but i prefer coconut milk...

    wanna the easiest way??? come to malaysia i'll cook for u guys...



    Edited by cahaya
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2006 at 14:51
    Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

    wanna the easiest way??? come to malaysia i'll cook for u guys...



    I'll be right over! What time is dinner?
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote babyblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Mar-2006 at 03:52
    hey i thought rendang's meant to be made with no curry powder at all...?
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Mar-2006 at 11:33

    lol@morty...

    let me know ur flight time baby... i'll fecth u..

    Well babyblue..for rendang .. Some people use curry powder some people dont... but if u wanna add some extra spicy flavor why not... well like my mommy's way.. we dont use curry powder... different style on different states... so.. i cant determine which is the exact way which is not... and i also dont use shrimp paste... but the taste still superb... but the shrimp will emphasize the flavor more...

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cywr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-Apr-2006 at 04:34
    Personaly i've tended to prefer the coconut milk based curries over the N. Indian varient, mostly because you don't need to use onions to get thickness in the gravy 

    Quote hey i thought rendang's meant to be made with no curry powder at all...?


    It depends, curry powder comes in many varieties, and the Indonesian ones i've seen are quite different from some of the Indian blends people would be most familiar with. Anyways, there are many ways of making Rendang, regional tastes and influences i guess.


    Edited by Cywr
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2006 at 14:47

    Pisang Goreng
    (Banana Fritters)

    Yield: 2 servings

    Ingredients

    • 4 Eggs
    • 12 T Flour
    • 4 Ripe bananas
    • Oil for deep frying
    • Cinnamon sugar

    Directions

    Slightly beat eggs and mix with flour and half cup water.

    Mash bananas with fork and mix thoroughly with flour and egg mixture. Deep-fry banana and flour mixture by the tablespoonful in hot oil until golden brown.

    Drain on absorbent paper and dust with cinnamon sugar.

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote šok geš Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2006 at 15:06
    Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

    Pisang Goreng
    (Banana Fritters)

    Yield: 2 servings

    too bad I'm logging in to AE while starving. I guess I naturally directed myself to this thread..and it looks so damn delicious!!

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2006 at 15:19

     as per my best buddy request... here is recipe of Gado-Gado... which is originally frm Indonesia....

             

     

    Gado-gado

    Cooked mixed vegetables with peanut sauce

    The vegetables:

      112 g / 4 oz / l cup cabbage or spring greens, shredded
      225 g / 8 oz / 2 cups French beans, cut into 1-cm / 1/2-inch lengths
      4 medium carrots, peeled and sliced thinly
      112 g / 4 oz /1 cup cauliflower florets
      112 g / 4 oz / 1 cup beansprouts, washed

    For the garnish:

      Some lettuce leaves and watercress
      2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
      1 medium-size potato, boiled in its skin,
         then peeled and sliced;
         or 225 g / 8 oz of slices of lontong (optional)
      1/2 cucumber, thinly sliced
      1 tbsp crisp-fried onions
      2 large krupuk, or a handful of fried emping,
         broken up into small pieces (optional)

    Boil the vegetables separately in slightly salted water, for 3-4 minutes, except the beansprouts which only need 2 minutes. Drain each vegetable separately in a colander.

    To serve, arrange the lettuce and watercress around the edge of a serving dish. Then pile the vegetables in the middle of the dish. Arrange the eggs, sliced potatoes or lontong, and sliced cucumber on top.

    Heat the peanut sauce in a small saucepan until hot; add more water if it is too thick. Adjust the seasoning, and pour the sauce over the vegetables. Sprinkle the fried onions on top. Serve warm or cold. If you want to serve hot gado-gado, it can be reheated in a microwave oven. When reheating, however, do not include the lettuce and watercress, cucumber slices, fried onions, krupuk or emping. Add these garnishes immediately before serving.


    Sambal kacang (bumbu sate)
    Peanut sauce

    This is the best-known, most popular sauce for satay. It is also used for gado-gado, and goes well with any grilled meat.

    If you like your satay sauce chilli-hot, there are several quite passable powdered instant sauces on the market. For making it yourself, there are various so-called short cuts, most of them involving crunchy peanut butter. Avoid these; the method described below is as easy, cheaper and much nicer. Makes about 280 ml / 1/2 pint / 1-1/4 cups of sauce

      112 ml / 4 fl oz / 1/2 cup vegetable oil
      225 g / 8 oz / 1-1/3 cups raw peanuts
      2 cloves garlic, chopped
      4 shallots, chopped
      A thin slice of shrimp paste (optional)
      Salt to taste
      1/2 tsp chilli powder
      1/2 tsp brown sugar
      1 tbsp dark soy sauce
      450 ml / 16 fl oz / 2 cups water
      1 tbsp tamarind water or juice of a lemon

    Stir-fry the peanuts for 4 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to drain in a colander, and leave to cool. Then pound or grind the nuts into a fine powder, using a blender, coffee grinder, or pestle and mortar. Discard the oil, except for 1 tablespoonful.

    Crush the garlic, shallots and shrimp paste in a mortar with a little salt, and fry in the remaining oil for 1 minute. Add the chilli powder, sugar, soy sauce and water. Bring this to the boil, then add the ground peanuts. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce becomes thick; this should take about 8-10 minutes. Add the tamarind water or lemon juice and more salt if needed.

    When cool, keep in a jar in the fridge. Reheat as required for use with satay or as a dip for lalab (crudites) or savoury snacks. The sauce will keep in the fridge for up to 1 week.

    source: http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinations/indonesia/gadogado .html

    p/s: the peanut sauce can be eaten with bread too...



    Edited by cahaya
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Apples n Oranges Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Apr-2006 at 13:19
    A TONGUE IN CHEEK HISTORY OF COOKING

    BY BUZZ BAXTER 2000
    HOW IT ALL BEGAN
    Cooking seems like such a simple art.  It seems to me that if you cook,  you must need fire.  Fire
    was discovered by man probably millions of years ago by our archaeological ancestors.  Of course
    they did not cook with it,  but probably worshipped it,  felt it's warmth,  it's pain,  and gazed in
    wonder as it lit up the darkness of night.  What an awesome discovery by the first man who
    probably saw a tree burning after a lightning strike.  How brave he must have been to get closer
    and investigate this strange phenomenon.  The Gods surely must have played a part in this power.
    Many years of respect for that fire and sitting around it for warmth in the winter cold had passed
    before some clumsy cave man dropped his raw piece of meat into that fire.  Before he could get it
    out of the fire and let it cool a bit to gnaw on again it was cooked.  What did that taste like?  Like
    most foods,  it could have been better tasting after falling in the fire,  or his palate found the taste
    repulsive after being used to the taste of raw meat.  If he found the taste to his liking,  he probably
    told his friends about it,  and they tried it.  Being hunters and gatherers in those days and not
    concerned with business as today,  he did not secretly hide the fact that he had discovered
    cooking, and open a business called "burnt_meat.com". Instead he shared his discovery with
    others by painting of his exploits on his living room wall.  His attractors saw his paintings,  and
    over eons of time,  perfected his discovery.
      
    
    http://www.thegutsygourmet.net/cook-hist.html
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2006 at 15:43
    OMG Cahaya, that Gado-Gado looks goody-goody! Looks easy to make and so quick - in less than 1/2 hour.
    "Morty

    Trust in God: She will provide." -- Emmeline Pankhurst
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Maziar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2006 at 16:49

    Recipe: Kubideh Kabab - Ground Meat Kababs

    2 pounds lamb with a little fat, ground or processed until very smooth
    2 medium onions, grated
    2 eggs, beaten
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    1/2 teaspoon turmeric
    1/2 teaspoon cumin
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon thyme
    butter

    Combine all ingredients, except butter, mixing well until sticky. Divide into about 20 balls, then with hands, place each ball around a skewer and mold to about 1 1/2 inch thickness in the shape of a large cigar. Grill for a few minutes on each size, brushing occasionally with butter, until done.

    Should be served as above with grilled tomatoes, atop a platter of rice.

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Land of Aryan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2006 at 08:28

    Khoresht Ghormeh Sabzii (Herbs Stew - Herbs & Vegetable Stew)



    (Serves 4)

    Ingredients:
    • Fresh spinach (esfenAg) 1 bunch or 1 medium size package.
    • Fresh dill (sheveed) 1/2 bunch.
    • Fresh parsely (ja`faree) 1 bunch.
    • Fresh cilantro or 1 bunch.
    • coriantro (geshneez)
    • Fresh Leak (tareh farangee) 1 bunch (use only the green stems).
    • Fresh chives (tareh) 1 bunch, or substitute stems of one
    • bunch of scallions (piAzcheh).
    • Fresh fenugreek
    • (shanbelileh) 1 bunch, or substitute 1 table spoon
    • of dried shanbelileh.
    • 1 pound stew meat (beef, lamb, veal, etc.), cubed.
    • 4 dried lemons (limoo amAnee) or,
    • 1 table spoon dried lemon powder (gard-e leemo amAnee).
    • 1 medium onion, finely diced.
    • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric (zard choobeh).
    • 3 tablespoons cooking oil.
    • 1 tablespoon lemon juice (optional).
    • 1 cup of pre-soaked dried beans, or substitute 1 can.
    • A touch each of salt, pepper and crushed red peppers (if you like it spicy).

    Directions:

      Wash the meat and let it drain.

      Cut off the heads of the leaks and scallions and put the stems along with the rest of vegetables in a kitchen stringer, thoroughly wash and drain them.

      Using a cutting board, while repeatedly bunching up all vegetables together, finely chop the vegetables. The smaller the pieces the better. If you have a food processor, you could use it in place of the manual labor :-)

      Place the chopped vegetables in a pot, with heat setting on high and frequently stir the vegetables until all their excess water has evaporated.

      Add two table spoons of cooking oil and continually stir fry the vegetables until they turn a browinsh color. This process should take about 15 minutes. Take the pot off and put it aside. During the stir fry process, you may add a bit more oil if needed. When finished, the vegetables resemble dried ones with no water remaining in the pot.

      In another pot, add about one table spoon of cooking oil and the chopped onions and stir fry until they turn a golden brown color. Add the meat, stir fry for a few minutes, add salt, pepper and turmeric and let the meat fry with the onions for a few minutes. If you are using dried beans, at this point drain them and add them to the mixture. Turn the heat setting to medium.

      Next poke a hole in each of the dried lemons and add them to the mixture (or add the powdered kind). Add about two cups (16 oz) of water, place the lid on the pot and let it boil for another 15 minutes.

      Add the fried vegetables into the mixture, turn the heat setting to medium-low and let it cook. The cooking time required from this point on is about an hour. Half way through this period, if you are using canned beans, add them into the mixture. Once the meat is separated when poked by a fork, the stew is ready. This stew is served over white rice.

      If you like the sour taste, you may add a table spoon of lemon juice towards the end of cooking.

    Hints:

    • When stir frying, its imperative to constantly stir the vegetables. Otherwise, they quickly form a crust and burn. You can easily undercook the vegetables but you can hardly ever over cook them. If they look watery stir fry them a bit longer.
    • Almost all of the vegetables listed above are easily found at produce section of grocery stores. The only exception to this is shanbelileh (fenugreek). You can purchase dried ones from middle eastern stores.
    • Tareh (called chives and sometimes garlic chives) is somewhat hard to find. In place of chives, use the stems of scallions (also called green onions).
    • There are two kinds of parsely in the market. One is labeled as parsely and the other is called Italian parsely which has larger size leaves. You may use either one.
    • This stew can be made with two kinds of dried/canned beans. Either use kidney beans (loobiA ghermez) or black-eyed beans (loobiA cheshm bolboli). The canned beans soften quickly, so add them almost at the end and do not use the liquid inside the can.
    • If your stew ends up having a bitter taste, you more than likely burned the vegetables. If it smells like hannA (henna), you added too much spinach. You can't recover from these two mishaps. If the vegetables swim to one side and the meat goes the opposite way, you've undercooked it. Put in back on medium heat and let some of the excess water evaporate.

    Courtesy of: Soheila Amiri

    http://www.farsieats.com/recipes/

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2006 at 14:53

    Originally posted by Aryan Aryan wrote:

  • Fresh cilantro or 1 bunch.
  • coriantro (geshneez)
  • Fresh Leak (tareh farangee) 1 bunch (use only the green stems).
  • Fresh chives (tareh) 1 bunch, or substitute stems of one
  • bunch of scallions (piAzcheh).
  • Fresh fenugreek
  • (shanbelileh) 1 bunch, or substitute 1 table spoon
  • of dried shanbelileh.
  • what are those??

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Land of Aryan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2006 at 16:14
    I just Copy & paste
    well, those are vegetable
     ok I searched google

    Coriandro (in Parsi = Geshniz)


    cilantro (Jafari)
    http://www.gastronomiavasca.net/glosario-file/482/Cilantro___Coriandro-thumbnail.jpg
    Fresh Leek (tareh farangee) [My mother don't use it, in fact it's 1st time that I see it in Ghorme Sabzi)



    Fresh chives (tareh)


    bunch of scallions (piAzcheh) ( SAme for it)


    Fresh fenugreek (shanbelileh)



    Edited by Land of Aryan
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dawn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Apr-2006 at 11:40

    A little more help:

    Leeks ,Chives, scallions are all members of the onion family, Coriandro or coriander leaves  and cilantro are the same plant. what we call coriander in north america  is the seed of the plant and tastes very differant.

    shanbelileh and  fenugreek are the same thing as far as I can tell. I was unfamiliar with shanbelileh so I looked it up.  Fenugreek has been used for centeries as a medicinal herb and food flavoring.

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