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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DemiSoda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 12:33

Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

I want to know how to cook a swede.... anyone have any ideas? I am just boiling them right now and mixing them in with other vegetables and spanish sausages in a nice stew.

Haggis Burger with Swede and Potato Chips

This may not be a traditional recipe but its an excellent way to enjoy haggis in warmer weather. This recipe is just one of the many ways a good haggis can be enjoyed. For those of you who are vegetarians this recipe can also be used with the vegetarian variety of haggis now available.

6 Portions

Preparation Time: 10 minutes
Cooking Time: 20 minutes

 

Haggis:

  • 1x500-700g haggis
  • 50g plain flour

Burger:

  • 12 slices of buttered bread or bun
  • 6 large flat mushrooms
  • 180g good cheddar, sliced
  • 2 large tomatoes, sliced

To Serve:

  • 60g rocket or watercress leaves
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons of crowdie (Scottish curd cheese), creme fraiche or sour cream
  • 6 small glasses of single malt whisky e.g. Oban (optional)

Chips:

  • 500g potatoes, peeled and cut into wedges around 1 cm thick and 3cm long, place them in a bowl of water
  • 500g swede, peeled trimmed and cut into wedges around 1cm thick and 3 cm long, place them in a bowl of water
  • maldon salt and freshly ground pepper

Method:

  1. Haggis: Remove the skin from the haggis and slice the haggis into 6 slices. Place the flour on a plate and season it with a little salt and pepper. Dust the haggis in the flour and set aside until ready to cook.
  2. Burger: Place the mushrooms on a grill pan and cover them with slices of Cheddar. Set aside until ready to cook.
  3. Chips: Heat oil in a deep fryer, saucepan or wok to 160C. Dry the potato and swede wedges thoroughly and fry them in batches in the hot oil for 3 minutes so that they float to the top and are tender but not crisp. Now heat the oil to 190C and fry the potato and swede wedges in it for 3 minutes, so that they are crisp and golden. Drain them on kitchen paper, season them with a little salt and keep them warm until ready to serve.
  4. Heat a little oil in a large frying pan over a moderate to high heat. When the oil is hot add the haggis slices to it and fry them for around 3 minutes on each side so that they are hot and cooked through. Remove them from the pan and keep them warm until ready to serve.
  5. While you are cooking the haggis. Preheat a grill to medium-high and place the mushrooms under it. Cook them for around 5 minutes until they are soft and the cheese has melted.
  6. To Serve: Place a slice of bread each plate, you may wish to put a little chutney on the bread. Place a mushroom on each slice followed by the haggis, tomato and a tablespoon each of crowdie, creme fraich or sour cream. Place a second slice of bread on each burger and place handfuls of the rocket leaves on each plate drizzled with a little olive oil. Distribute the chips among the servings and place a small glass of whisky on each plate (optional). Serve.

http://www.foodiesite.com/recipes/2000-05/haggisburger.jsp

AAYO GORKHALI
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 12:41
what is haggis???
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 14:23
Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

what is haggis???


Hi Cahaya! "Haggis" is the national dish of Scotland. It consists of animal "inner organs", including lung! Here's a site with all the info, including recipe. I'm grossed out already!

http://www.gumbopages.com/food/scottish/haggis.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 15:13

which animal u are referring too?????

can this thing being replaced with other part of animal which is halal???

maybe would like to try them...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 19:00
Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

which animal u are referring too?????


can this thing being replaced with other part of animal which is halal???


maybe would like to try them...



Now I am confused! One of the above recipes says to, "Remove the skin from the haggis and slice the haggis into 6 slices". Is it a sheep, perhaps? I'm not sure. We need a haggis expert to respond here.

What is a "haggis"?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 19:12

haggggggis

I hate the stuff, it tastes foul and is made from foul things.



Edited by Zagros
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Mar-2006 at 19:45
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

haggggggis


I hate the stuff, it tastes foul and is made from foul things.



Okayyyy, but what is it? Animal, vegetable or mineral?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cywr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Mar-2006 at 19:14
Its made from Sheep heart, liver and lungs, but goat was supposidly sometimes traditionaly used too. Mixed with onion, outmeal, beef or mutton fat and spices, then boiled inside the stomach, you don't eat the stomach though, unless your a macho freak or something.
Supposidly it originated as a quick and easy hunter snack, made from the cuts that would spoil quickly so as to preserve the better cuts that could be kept longer and/or treated for when the hunters got home. How it became a delicacy is one of those bizare modern twists.

Remarkably, there are also vegetarian haggis meals, though to me that sounds like haggis without the haggis.
Still, i shall be avoiding both.
Arrrgh!!"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Mar-2006 at 09:52
oh.. freaky and funny stuff... well... anyone dare to eat it???
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morticia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Mar-2006 at 16:13
Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

oh.. freaky and funny stuff... well... anyone dare to eat it???


Not me! Interestingly, I found an article that states: "Note: The U.S. government has declared that sheep lungs are dangerous for human consumption, so tradtional haggis is illegal in the U.S. In addition, many state and local laws ban the sale or consumption of sheep stomachs and/or brains."

http://www.sunwayco.com/haggis.html

So, here's the "Americanized Haggis" version:
Americanized Haggis (from Country Living, March 1991)
        1 lb boneless lamb shoulder or breast, cut into pieces (or ground lamb)
        1/2 lb lamb liver, cut into pieces
        1/2 c water
        1 small onion, coarsely chopped
        1 large egg
        3/4 ts salt
        3/4 ts pepper, black
        1/2 ts sugar
        1/4 ts ginger, ground
        1/8 ts cloves, ground
        1/8 ts nutmeg, ground
        1 c oats, rolled, old fashioned
Heat oven to 350-F. Grease an 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inch loaf pan.

In food processor with chopping blade, process together half of the lamb, the liver, water, onion, egg, salt, pepper, sugar, ginger, cloves, and nutmeg until well combined. Add the remaining half of the lamb and the oats; process until well combined.

Spoon lamb mixture into the greased pan; pat surface to level. Bake 45 to 55 minutes or until center feels firm when gently pressed. Cool 5 minutes in pan; unmold onto platter; slice and serve.

Notes: This skinless haggis is planned for American tastes, yet contains many of the ingredients found in the real thing. You can unmold the loaf and serve it in place of the purchased haggis recipes


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cywr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Mar-2006 at 17:52
No stomach, and baked? Bah! Wimps 
Arrrgh!!"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Mar-2006 at 15:19

lol@cywr... i think.. Morty method is more acceptable in making hinggis...

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goban Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 23:11

Yes, usually when people categorize a food as a ‘delicacy’ it is because that is the only excuse to still eat it.

 

I remember the first time I tried to eat American chitlins. It was an interesting experience. I didn’t particularly like them, but some people love it!

 

Ingredients:

 

2 pounds hog maws (pig stomach)

 

2 pounds chitterlings (pig intestines)

 

3 quarts water

 

1 teaspoon salt

 

1/2 teaspoon red pepper (flakes)

 

1 medium peeled onion (white or yellow)

 

The recipe calls for a 1 hour boil of the stomach, then to add the chitterlings for an additional 30 mins. Be sure to clean them thoroughly before you begin!

 

Myself, I’d rather prefer chicken lips.

 

“But chickens don’t have lips”.

 

Precisely…

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dirtnap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2006 at 00:10
If you are all chefs, just ignore this post but if you are slightly retarded it might make some sense.

Here is what I made tonight and it was very tasty. I call it, Why won't she return my calls?

1 sweet onion (it was purple)
1 bell pepper green
10 or 20 cherry tomatos
very tiny bit of S n P
Saute and set aside.

2 filets of pink Salmon and grill them to a tender and juicy perfection. Just a tiny pinch of salt.

I love natural flavors but a pinch of salt goes a long way.

Butter pasta with asperagus tips.

Edited by dirtnap










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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2006 at 01:21

I just invented a recipe, ate it today.

 

Celeraic Paul

 

1 Celeriac

Bacon (vege)

English Apples (as opposed to supermarket French... EG strong and bitter, not sweet and light)

Brown Sugar.

 

1) Take 2/3rds of the apples, mix with suger  and water, blend into apple sauce.

2) Dice other 1/3 of apples.

3) Peel and hollow out celeriac.

4) Stuff celeriac with half the aplle sauce, the diced apple and the bacon.

5) Baked the stuffed celeriac till cooked through. Times will vary depending upon size of celeriac.

6) Slice and serve with remaining 1/3 of apple sauce as side dish.

 

   



Edited by Paul
Light blue touch paper and stand well back

http://www.maquahuitl.co.uk

http://www.toltecitztli.co.uk
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gyadu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2006 at 15:04
Saucy Tomato Sabzi

By Saroj Kering

 

Ethnicity
Indian

Type of Meal
Party, Lunch, Dinner

Type of Dish
Side Dishes, Gravies

Main Ingredients

Tomatoes, Green Chillies, Curry Leaves

 Ingredients   Method
3 med. ripe tomatoes
2 green chillies slit
1 stalk curryleaves
1/2 tbsp. coriander chopped fine
1/2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. red chilli powder
1/8 tsp. turmeric powder
1/8 tsp garam masala
1/4 tsp cummin seeds powder
1/4 tsp. dhania powder
3-4 pinches asafoetidaa
salt to taste
1/4 tsp. each cumin & mustard seeds
1 tbsp. oil


http://www.pichirichi.com/images/Funny-Food/015_tomato.jpg

  1. Chop tomatoes into eight pieces each.
  2. Destalk curry leaves. Heat oil in a pan.
  3. Add seeds, allow to splutter.
  4. Add asafoetida, curry leaves, chillies.
  5. Stir and add tomatoes.
  6. Add all dry masalas and salt over them.
  7. Stir gently, cover and cook for 3-4 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle sugar, stir and simmer 2 minutes.
  9. Garnish with coriander before serving.
  10. Serve hot with phulkas or rotis.

Making Time : 15 minutes
Makes : 3 servings
Shelf Life : Best fresh
http://food.sify.com/recipe.php?id=13614458&ctid=76& cid=13293078

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gyadu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Mar-2006 at 22:24

Shakshuka

A recipe for one of the most popular egg dishes in Israel

By Joan Nathan

Reprinted with permission from The Foods of Israel Today (Knopf).

 

In 1930, Simon Agranat, the chief justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, wrote to his aunt and uncle in Chicago: "I had my eighth successive egg meal during my three-day jour­ney through the Emek (the valley)." Eggs have always been a main protein for people in Israel. When I lived in Jerusalem, I would make for my breakfast--or even for dinner--scrambled eggs with sauteed spring onions, fresh herbs, and dollops of cream cheese melted into the eggs as they were cooking.

Probably the most popular egg dish in Israel is shakshuka, one of those ono­matopoeic Hebrew and North African words, meaning "all mixed up." The most famous rendition of this tomato dish, which is sometimes mixed with meat but more often made in Israel with scrambled or poached eggs, is served at the Tripolitana Doktor Shakshuka Restaurant in old Jaffa.

 

Doktor Shakshuka, owned by a large Libyan family, is located near the antique market in an old stone-arched building with colorful Arab-tiled floors. "When I was a young girl at the age of 10 I liked to cook," said Sarah Gambsor, the main cook of the restaurant and wife of one of the owners. "My mother told me that I should marry someone who has a restaurant." And she did just that.

 

Mrs. Gambsor, a large woman who clearly enjoys eating what she cooks, demonstrated that the dish starts with a heavy frying pan and tomato sauce. Then eggs are carefully broken in and left to set or, if the diner prefers, scrambled in as they cook. The shakshuka isthen served in the frying pan at the table.

The Shakshuka Recipe

Yield: six servings

 

2 pounds fresh tomatoes, unpeeled and cut in quarters, or one 28-ounce can tomatoes

6 cloves garlic, roughly diced

2 teaspoons salt, or to taste

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

2 teaspoons tomato paste

1/4 cup vegetable oil

6 large eggs

 

1. Place the tomatoes, garlic, salt, paprika, tomato paste, and vegetable oil in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer and cook, uncovered, over low heat until thick, for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

 

2. Ladle the tomato sauce into a greased 12-inch frying pan. Bring to a sim­mer and break the eggs over the tomatoes. Gently break the yolks with a fork. Cover and continue to cook for about 3 to 4 minutes, until the eggs are set. Bring the frying pan directly to the table. Set it on a trivet and spoon out the shakshuka.

 

NOTE: Alternatively, you can make individual portions, as they do at Doktor Shakshuka, by ladling some of the sauce into a very small pan and poaching one egg in it.

 

Joan Nathan lived in Israel for three yeas where she worked for former Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem. She is the author of several cookbooks, contributes articles on international ethnic food and special holiday features to The New York Times, Food Arts, Gormet, and the B'nai B'rith International Jewish Monthly. This article is reprinted with permission from The Foods of Israel Today published by Knopf. Copyright Joan Nathan 2001.

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/culture/food/IsraeliFood/New State/Shakshuka.htm

http://israelvisit.co.il/tomato.gif

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Halevi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Mar-2006 at 23:47
Originally posted by Gyadu Gyadu wrote:

Shakshuka

A recipe for one of the most popular egg dishes in Israel

By Joan Nathan

...




Joan Nathan's recipe isnt great... but shakshuka is awsome. I especially like it spiced up with paprika, and maybe a little cayenne...

I think it's Libyan-Jewish, originally...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Mar-2006 at 06:52

Originally posted by Cywr Cywr wrote:

Its made from Sheep heart, liver and lungs, but goat was supposidly sometimes traditionaly used too. Mixed with onion, outmeal, beef or mutton fat and spices, then boiled inside the stomach, you don't eat the stomach though, unless your a macho freak or something.
Supposidly it originated as a quick and easy hunter snack, made from the cuts that would spoil quickly so as to preserve the better cuts that could be kept longer and/or treated for when the hunters got home. How it became a delicacy is one of those bizare modern twists.

Remarkably, there are also vegetarian haggis meals, though to me that sounds like haggis without the haggis.
Still, i shall be avoiding both.

Sounds like pölsa, an old Swedish dish made from sheep's lung, liver, spleen, feet and heart (pick and choose what you want), cooked with barley grain - traditionally in a sheep's stomach, together with the head to spice it up a bit. And yeah, we eat it, at least in the north.

edit: whoa, can you scale the pic somehow?

 



Edited by Dawn
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Halevi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Mar-2006 at 06:55
Anyone have any good stuffed vegetable recipes?
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