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Forum LockedThe Great Chevauchee

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Wulfstan View Drop Down
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    Posted: 02-Jun-2009 at 20:09
On the 5 October 1355 Edward of Woodstock, the Black Prince, with an Anglo-Gascon army left Bordeaux to conduct a chevauchee across southern France. On the 12 October Prince Edward crossed the frontier of Gascony and entered the county of Armagnac to begin a particular devasting raid that reached Narbonne close to the Mediterranean Sea.
 
No battles were won and no territory conquered, but the raid had ruined 500 villages in a band about 200 miles long and 40 miles wide. A dozen walled towns were badly damaged, and the residential and trading areas of three major cities were ruined. The economy of Languedoc was seriously affected and its taxable base was much reduced. Furthermore, what taxes were collected was used locally and none went to Paris. In that sense the raid was a huge success and the Black Prince was highly satisfied.
 
This raid was a particular embarrassment and humiliation to the French king by the ease which the Anglo-Gascons had been able to penetrate 200 miles into French territory, and by the reluctance of a larger French army led by the count of Armagnac to bring its enemy to battle.
 
Another chevauchee the following year, this time to the north, resulted in Battle of Poitiers where the French were defeated and the French king  captured. 
From Woden sprang all our royal kin.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Temujin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Jun-2009 at 20:35
interesting stuff
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JRScotia View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JRScotia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Jun-2009 at 01:06
The chevauchee was much used in the Hundred Years War probably in part because so many troops or potential troops had died to the Black Death. Although one of its main practicioners in that war was the Black Prince others also used it such as John of Gaunt and Edward III. However, the Hundred Years War wasn't the tactic's first use. The Scots used it extensively in the Scottish War of Independence at least in part to force tribute from the cities of northern England and it was used in Spain as well.
 

Edited by JRScotia - 03-Jun-2009 at 01:07
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wulfstan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Jun-2009 at 19:44
Originally posted by JRScotia

The chevauchee was much used in the Hundred Years War probably in part because so many troops or potential troops had died to the Black Death. Although one of its main practicioners in that war was the Black Prince others also used it such as John of Gaunt and Edward III. However, the Hundred Years War wasn't the tactic's first use. The Scots used it extensively in the Scottish War of Independence at least in part to force tribute from the cities of northern England and it was used in Spain as well.
 
 
Just up to and after the battle of Neville`s Cross the continual half war between England and Scotland  caused a decline in the northern economy. Arable farming gave way to sheep and cattle farming which required less manpower, and animals could be removed to higher ground and forrests at the first sign of danger. Around the larger towns a war economy developed, and the trade in captured goods increased and became a main pillar of the local economy.
 
The English Wardens of the Marches could not pacify the border regions but they could contain it, and that was good enough for Edward III and his ministers at Westminster.
From Woden sprang all our royal kin.
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