History Community ~ All Empires Homepage


This is the Archive on WORLD Historia, the old original forum.

 You cannot post here - you can only read.

 

Here is the link to the new forum:

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Forum LockedRussian Literature of USSR period

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Ruslan_Sharipov View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Russian Federation
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ruslan_Sharipov Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Russian Literature of USSR period
    Posted: 25-Oct-2006 at 04:02
Some Russian fiction books of the USSR period will be posted on the site http://sovlit2.narod.ru . You are welcome to read and discuss them.
Back to Top
Komnenos View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
Defensor Fidei

Joined: 20-Dec-2004
Location: Neutral Zone
Status: Offline
Points: 4387
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Komnenos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Oct-2006 at 04:11
Thanks for posting that, however it links to website exclusively in Rusian and Cyrilic. Not to helpful for all of us not in command of either. Any English translation?
Anyway, I hope it includes Michail Bulgakov's "Master and Margarita", a hilarious novel about the Devil on the loose in Stalin's Moscow, one of my all-time favourite books.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 06-Dec-2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 7011
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Oct-2006 at 07:54
Personally I love Ilf and Petrov's two novels about Ostap Bender - The Twelve Chairs and The Golden Calf, set at the time of the New Economic Program. They're both easily available in translation though - and Mel Brooks made a film of one of them.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork
Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.
Back to Top
TheDiplomat View Drop Down
Sultan
Sultan
Avatar
Retired AE Moderator

Joined: 09-Aug-2004
Location: Turkey
Status: Offline
Points: 1994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TheDiplomat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 03:34
 and Don'T you guys think that the Russian literature of the USSR period is ideologically-driven to a large extend? 
ARDA:The best Turkish diplomat ever!

Back to Top
Constantine XI View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar
Lord of Hut River Province Principality

Joined: 01-May-2005
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 5711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Constantine XI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 03:50
I have always been amazed by Russian literature in general. The fact that such a society, so heavily laden with censorship and surveillance, has been able to produce such inspired literary figures is just amazing.
It is not the challenges a people face which define who they are, but rather the way in which they respond to those challenges.

Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 06-Dec-2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 7011
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 05:22
Originally posted by TheDiplomat TheDiplomat wrote:

 and Don'T you guys think that the Russian literature of the USSR period is ideologically-driven to a large extend? 
 
Depends what you class as 'literature' I guess.
 
The interesting thing, as Constantine points out, is that so much of it wasn't.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork
Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.
Back to Top
Kalevipoeg View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar

Joined: 06-Aug-2004
Location: Estonia
Status: Offline
Points: 1465
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kalevipoeg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 08:37
...or simply the propagandistic literature is simply pushed aside and the gems are picked out, atleast in the West it has always been so since Pushkin and Gogol i suppose.
There is nothing in the world more helpless and irresponsible than a man in the depths of an ether binge...
Back to Top
Cezar View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar

Joined: 09-Nov-2005
Location: Romania
Status: Offline
Points: 1211
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cezar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 13:24
A&B Strugatzky - "Stalker"  - both the novel and the movie (directed by Tarkovsky) on top of my list.
A. Tolstoi - "Aelita", "Garin's Hyperboloid" though somehow ideologycally biased are fine works
A.E. Beleaev - the Soviet A.E. van Vogt (better style anyway)
M. Bulgakov - excellent!
It seems that the great classics had (have?) quite fine followers.
Back to Top
Krum View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar

Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Bulgaria
Status: Offline
Points: 413
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Krum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 14:45
What about Boris L. Pasternak and Aleksandr I. Solzhenitzyn.They were too a great writers and even Nobel Prize winners.
It is only the dead who have seen the end of war.
Plato
Back to Top
Anton View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph


Joined: 23-Jun-2006
Location: Bulgaria
Status: Offline
Points: 2888
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2006 at 19:37

We had a lot of discussion regarding Mayakovski poetry. From the first sight it looks like very political and Soviet. But my opinion is that more detailed reading of it reveals deeply hidden irony. Nobody believes me.



Edited by Anton - 26-Oct-2006 at 19:41
.
Back to Top
Ruslan_Sharipov View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Russian Federation
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ruslan_Sharipov Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Oct-2006 at 04:32
Originally posted by Komnenos Komnenos wrote:

Anyway, I hope it includes Michail Bulgakov's "Master and Margarita", a hilarious novel about the Devil on the loose in Stalin's Moscow, one of my all-time favourite books.
I know that some Russian authors of the soviet period are well-known in western countries (Michail Bulgakov is one of them). Mostly because they emigrated or was in opposition to the regime. However, in order to make true impression of the epoch one should have wider coverage. So, I see my mission in posting books which are rare and authors are otherwise not known at all.
 
Originally posted by Komnenos Komnenos wrote:

Any English translation?
I have written many science texts in English (see http://arxiv.org/find/grp_cs,grp_physics,grp_math,grp_nlin/1/au:+Sharipov/0/1/0/all/0/1).
But I have no experience of translating fiction books. I can try to translate those things posted in http://sovlit2.narod.ru but only if somebody of native English speakers with the sense of fiction writing will help me in choosing a true wording.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 06-Dec-2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 7011
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Oct-2006 at 09:16
Originally posted by Anton Anton wrote:

We had a lot of discussion regarding Mayakovski poetry. From the first sight it looks like very political and Soviet. But my opinion is that more detailed reading of it reveals deeply hidden irony. Nobody believes me.

There can be no doubt that Mayakovsky for most of his life was a keen socialist and Bolshevik. That's apparent in his life in general, not just in his poetry.
 
On the other hand his genius as a poet puts him outside politics. What happened to him in the last couple of years before his suicide is unclear: he was obviously disillusioned, presumably with Stalin's regime. And The Bedbug (Klop) is definitely ironic. But I doubt that he lost his underlying belief that the future lay with communism.
 
In his last poem, in his suicide note, he wrote "The love boat has crashed against the daily routine. You and I, we are quits, and there is no point in listing mutual pains, sorrows, and hurts."
 
I guess most probably he was referring to something to do with his discovery of his illegitimate daughter by the American Elli Jones, but it could be a metaphor for his relationship with the Stalinist regime.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork
Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 06-Dec-2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 7011
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Oct-2006 at 09:18
Originally posted by Ruslan_Sharipov Ruslan_Sharipov wrote:

But I have no experience of translating fiction books. I can try to translate those things posted in http://sovlit2.narod.ru but only if somebody of native English speakers with the sense of fiction writing will help me in choosing a true wording.
I'd be willing to try, though there could be a problem with time available. My Russian is pretty rusty but it used to be fluent.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork
Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.
Back to Top
Ruslan_Sharipov View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Russian Federation
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ruslan_Sharipov Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Nov-2006 at 10:26
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

I'd be willing to try, though there could be a problem with time available. My Russian is pretty rusty but it used to be fluent.
I have added some parts in English to http://sovlit2.narod.ru, please, look and say if my English is OK.
Back to Top
Ruslan_Sharipov View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Russian Federation
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ruslan_Sharipov Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Nov-2008 at 11:43
All of the 6 part of the novell "Invicible Sandjar"by M. Sheverdin (in Russian) are now available on the site http://sovlit2.narod.ru. I am looking for volunteers who will help me to translate them into English. Native English speakers are needed.
Back to Top
Husaria View Drop Down
Pretorian
Pretorian
Avatar

Joined: 28-Jul-2008
Status: Offline
Points: 150
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Husaria Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12-Nov-2008 at 06:01
[/QUOTE]
I have added some parts in English to http://sovlit2.narod.ru, please, look and say if my English is OK.[/QUOTE]

I looked through and for someone who isn't a native english speaker its written understandably, you easily get the majority of what your trying to say and the expressions.
"The best tank terrain is that without anti-tank weapons."
-Russian military doctrine.
Back to Top
Ruslan_Sharipov View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 25-Oct-2006
Location: Russian Federation
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ruslan_Sharipov Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-May-2009 at 05:50
A new author is added to the site http://sovlit2.narod.ru. That is G. I. Tsodikova with her novel "The frontier guard Anton and his little friends".


Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.