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The etymology of "Kaplan"

Printed From: History Community ~ All Empires
Category: Scholarly Pursuits
Forum Name: Linguistics
Forum Description: Discuss linguistics: the study of languages
Moderators: gcle2003, King John
URL: http://www.allempires.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=27213
Printed Date: 18-Dec-2017 at 20:17
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Topic: The etymology of "Kaplan"
Posted By: Bulldog
Subject: The etymology of "Kaplan"
Date Posted: 16-May-2009 at 02:43
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I've heard this name used quite alot, the only meaning I know for it is "Tiger" in Turkish, its used as a name, usually a surname. Kaplan also exists in other Turkic dialects, however, I also have heard that the name is used among Jews aswell and I think its used in Pakistan and India but I'm not sure.

So where does the word derive from? how comes its so widely used in unrelated language groups?


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      “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world remains and is immortal.”
Albert Pine




Replies:
Posted By: gcle2003
Date Posted: 16-May-2009 at 20:47
The Ashkenazi Jewish name is taken straight from the German 'Kaplan' which means (and is cognate with) 'chaplain', and therefore equivalent to the common Hebrew surname 'Cohen'.

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Citizen of Ankh-Morpork
Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.


Posted By: Basmachi
Date Posted: 26-May-2009 at 16:02
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

The Ashkenazi Jewish name is taken straight from the German 'Kaplan' which means (and is cognate with) 'chaplain', and therefore equivalent to the common Hebrew surname 'Cohen'.


Some Historians claim Askenazi Jewishs are actually Khazar Turks. Khazars was Jewish Turks, but they can be assimilated in Hebrews in progress of time.


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"Yesterday is but today's memory, tomorrow is today's dream." (Khalil Gibran)


Posted By: King John
Date Posted: 26-May-2009 at 18:30
Lot's of Historians see that theory as bunk.  But either way that comment has nothing to do with this thread.  Please stay on topic, Basmachi.



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