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"Mao: the unknown story" by Jung Chang

Printed From: History Community ~ All Empires
Category: Regional History or Period History
Forum Name: Modern History
Forum Description: World History from 1918 to the 21st century.
Moderators: Constantine XI, The Hidden Face, Pikeshot1600, Sparten, Leonidas, gcle2003
URL: http://www.allempires.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=26261
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Topic: "Mao: the unknown story" by Jung Chang
Posted By: Fonck
Subject: "Mao: the unknown story" by Jung Chang
Date Posted: 29-Dec-2008 at 06:28

UPDATE, OUR CURRENTLY ACTIVE FORUM IS AT:

Allempires.net/forum


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The Vice-Chancellor of the Hong Kong University (1986-1995) Professor Wang Gungwu, who is major in history, promoted this book to the HKU staff and students at the HKU library:

http://lib.hku.hk/friends/reading_club/0506.html#3 -



Replies:
Posted By: edgewaters
Date Posted: 30-Dec-2008 at 05:36

From what I know of Mao, he was unconcerned with human suffering and felt that the deaths that resulted from his policies were worth the cost, because China had an abundance of population.

However, I'm very skeptical of some of the quotes you've posted. "One or two beaten to death, no big deal" seems like a sentiment Mao might very well hold ... but would Mao say "no big deal?" I'm not sure it's an expression that would have been used in that time and place. I smell fabrication here, and also in the overly lurid nature of other quotes: "It's wonderful, wonderful!" sounds like a line for a moustache-twirling villain in a badly-written movie.

It's possible they're accurate but on the face of it, I'm leaning towards alot of skepticism without some very solid documentation.

There seems to be just one source for many of these quotes, the book "Mao: the Unknown Story" by Jung Chang, and given their shocking nature, one would think they would be more widely documented. Whenever I see many, many internet hits all pointing back to just a single secondary source I am also skeptical.



Posted By: Fonck
Date Posted: 16-Jun-2009 at 08:56

//From what I know of Mao, he was unconcerned with human suffering and felt that the deaths that resulted from his policies were worth the cost, because China had an abundance of population.//

I appreciate you have this comment. Thanks very much.
 
Since I do not major in History at HKU, it might be difficult for me to response to your other comments. I apologize for that.


Posted By: Fonck
Date Posted: 16-Jun-2009 at 08:58
The Vice-Chancellor of the Hong Kong University (1986-1995) Professor Wang Gungwu, who is major in history, promoted this book to the HKU staff and students at the HKU library:

http://lib.hku.hk/friends/reading_club/0506.html#3 - http://lib.hku.hk/friends/reading_club/0506.html#3

A grammatical mistake above:
 
"who is major in history" should be changed to "who specializes in"
 
I apologize for that. 


Posted By: Fonck
Date Posted: 16-Jun-2009 at 08:59
Message from The Vice-Chancellor

I am very pleased to inform you that our former Vice-Chancellor,
Professor Wang Gungwu, has been conferred an Honorary Doctor of
Letters by the University of Cambridge at its 800th anniversary
celebrations. This is an honour which recognizes the contributions he
has made to the discipline of History, to the University and to higher
education.

I have extended my warmest congratulations to Professor Wang on
behalf of the University, and I know colleagues, students and alumni
will be as delighted as I am to see Professor Wang so honoured.

During his Vice-Chancellorship at HKU from 1986 to 1995, Professor
Wang made many contributions to the University that the HKU
community remembers to this day with gratitude and respect. As a
firm believer in the benefits of a global outlook, Professor Wang
strongly encouraged the establishment of partnerships and exchanges
with international and Mainland institutions.

Under his stewardship, The University of Hong Kong Foundation for
Educational Development and Research was established in 1995. The
Foundation was the first of its kind in the local tertiary education
sector, and was aimed at fostering stronger links with the community
as well as enhancing the University’s capacity for teaching and
research. Professor Wang’s pioneering achievements continue to
support the University’s development today, and will go on doing so
for generations to come.


Professor Lap-Chee Tsui
Vice-Chancellor
HKU


Posted By: lirelou
Date Posted: 19-Jun-2009 at 02:24
Edgewaters. Very good points on sources, or lack thereof. However your fixating on "no big deal" begs the question: What would the Chinese expression be? And who did the translation? I have read through several poorly translated Asian works, and it took a great amount of effort, which I invested only because the source, though often single, was well placed or qualified to write his account. Whatever axe of his own he might have had to grind.

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Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì



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