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Forum LockedPost-Ice Age Flooding: Mediterranean and Black Seas

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YusakuJon3 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote YusakuJon3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Post-Ice Age Flooding: Mediterranean and Black Seas
    Posted: 19-Mar-2006 at 09:22
The recent posts about Ice Age "civilizations" whose remains may be submerged beneath the risen sea levels got me to thinking.  There are theories concerning how the Mediterranean and Black Seas got to their present levels suggesting that they were once much lower and at least temporarily closed off from the Atlantic Ocean and each other.  When the sea levels rose at the end of the most recent Ice Age, it is theorized that first the Mediterranean, then the Black Sea flooded when the natural dykes holding back the waters of the Atlantic broke through.  At least the inundation of the present Black Sea is dated to within the past 12,000 - 10,000 years, and evidence of submerged paleolithic settlements are pointed to there.  But has there been any evidence supporting an estimated date for the Mediterranean?

A good part of this is important because of the submerged civilization theory, plus some suggestions that the Great Flood may have had its origins in the inundation of the Black Sea.  Such as catastrophic event would've left an impression on the hunter-gatherer tribes and nascent settlements of the region that would circulate as legends well into historic times.  If the Mediterranean flood is true, could it have left an even stronger impression on paleolithic culture which survived as the Atlantis myth that Plato recorded?

Just my two ¥

(Edit: "event" has a "T"!  T!  T!  T! [sfx of repeated head-banging] -- Yusaku Jon III, 09:22 EDT  March 19th, 2006)


Edited by YusakuJon3
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Post Options Post Options   Quote docyabut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2006 at 10:48
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maju Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2006 at 18:32
Doesn't seem that whatever gradual evaquation of waters from the Black Sea to the Med that may have happened, would have caused any flood. Such an event would be gradual.

The Med was always connected to the Ocean but its levels, as those of the Atlantic were lower due to the fact that much water was just frozen in the Scandinavian and North American ice sheets.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maljkovic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Mar-2006 at 06:51
Wrong, the Med was flooded about 5 milion years ago. There are some who say it was then resealed and flooded again 34.000 years ago, but that IMHO is crock.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maju Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Mar-2006 at 09:36
You wrong: the Med was all the time connected to the Ocean. The depth of the Strait of Gibraltar is just too large to allow for any blockade of the channel without major tectonic modifications... that are not registered anywhere.

The only serious consideration about Gibraltar being passable is that it may have been less wide and even have some islands allowing a more easy "island hoping" for erectus and neanderthals. But this is very speculative. In any case the Med was all the time connected to the Ocean so far.

Some time in the future Gibraltar Strait will be compressed and the Med will become a salty lake like the Caspian Sea... but not so far.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote YusakuJon3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Mar-2006 at 08:39
Another theory comes to mind when considering the knowledge of plate tectonics and the changes it might've brought to the geography of this planet over the period of millions of years.   There used to be a similar body of water known to modern geologists as Tethys.   At least until after the era following the great extinction of the dinosaurs, this larger sea existed where much of the Sahara Desert now exists and included what is now the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, which was but part of a even broader ocean at the time.  Then the continents began to drift into their current positions, and the sea floor which became northern Africa elevated until it became exposed.  Evidence of the ancient Tethys's existence is borne out by fossils of ancestors of the modern whale and porpoise dug out of the Sahara in Egypt, as well as a fish-eating dinosaur found in even older rocks in Algeria.  Some have seen the Mediterranean as being a remnant of that ancient sea now open to the oceans by that narrow strait in the west.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maju Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Mar-2006 at 03:19
That Tethys existed doesn't mean that the ancient soil of the Sahara was then under the water: it means that Africa and Eurasia were more separated then. 

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Post Options Post Options   Quote YusakuJon3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Mar-2006 at 19:59
And yet, the whale and dinosaur fossils were found in the interior of north Africa, far from the shores of the Mediterranean.  As the sea level has also risen and fallen dramatically over periods of several millions of years, parts of the continents were submerged at one time or another.  During the last Ice Age, the floors of the Bering Sea, the English Channel and much of the sea bed surrounding the Indonesian archepelago were exposed.  Geologists are finding evidence of the Arctic Sea being landlocked and being mostly freshwater 55 million years ago during a period of warm temperatures which promoted the growth of water lilies there.  Only 15 million years before then, an inland sea existed on North America where the states of Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana are today.

In fact, much of the continents as we know them today might have originally been undersea bedrock laid down by the same volcanic activity which continues around today's rift zones.   These are among the oldest rocks, often found at continental "cores" such as northern Canada and Siberia.  In the Himilayas, the impact of the Indian subcontinental plate literally squeezed oceanic bedrock upwards as part of the mountain range.  Ultimately, the processes of volcanism, erosion and sedimentation have added to the continent-building process, giving us the sizable landlmasses that we know in the present day.
"There you go again!"

-- President Ronald W. Reagan (directed towards reporters at a White House press conference, mid-1980s)
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