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Forum LockedPersian Jug found in Jerusalem (12th century)

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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14-Mar-2009 at 13:18
 
 
The jug inscribed with a Persian love poem. Photo: Clara Amit.
 
JERUSALEM.- A fragment of a pottery vessel of Persian provenance that dates to the Middle Ages (12th-13th centuries CE) was discovered in an archaeological excavation directed by Dr. Rina Avner, on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, in the Old City of Jerusalem, prior to construction by a private contractor.
The fragment is treated with a turquoise glaze and is adorned with floral patterns and a black inscription. While studying the artifact prior to publication, Rivka Cohen-Amin of the Israel Antiquities Authority discerned that the inscription on the neck of the vessel is written in Persian. The inscription consists of a line that was taken from a quatrain. The inscription, which was translated by Dr. Julia Rabanovich of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, reads: “Was once the embrace of a lover that entreat”.
The inscription will be published by Dr. Nitsan Amitai-Preiss of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, within the framework of the final excavation report.
According to Rivka Cohen-Amin the words are from the Rubaiyat, by the poet Omar Khayyam. Omar Khayyam was an astronomer, mathematician and one of the most famous Persian poets of the Middle Ages (11th-12th centuries CE).
The following is the complete translation of the poem:
 
Rubaiyat, by Omar Khayyam

این کوزه چو من عاشق زاری بوده است
This clay pot like a lover once in heat
در بند سر زلف نگاری بوده‌ست
A lock of hair his senses did defeat
ایندسته که بر گردن او می‌بینی
The handle that has made the bottleneck its own seat
دستی‌ست که برگردن یاری بوده‌ست
Was once the embrace of a lover that entreat
 
The phenomenon of a Persian pottery vessel inscribed with a poem is known elsewhere in the world; however, this is the first occurrence of such a vessel in Israel.
The question of how the vessel came to be in Jerusalem is a mystery – was it brought here by merchants or could it possibly have been a gift someone presented to his Jerusalemite lover? 
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Al Jassas View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2009 at 14:49

Hello Cyrus

Well Persian pottery was quite popular in those days especially that several Persian cities had their entire economies based on such industries. I think it was Qashan that was the center at that time but you know better.

Also there was the fact that Persian regiments send by the Seljuqs did fight along with the vassals of the seljuqs and where there is an army there was bound to be merchants.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2009 at 17:59
As I know some parts of Jerusalem have also Persian names, like Muristan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muristan I agree that they could be all from the Slejuk period.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2009 at 18:08
Hello Cyrus
 
Well Persians did settle in the levant especially after the conquests. They had two major colonies, one in Baalbek and the other in Tripoli as well as Damascus and the Syrian coast. It haven't read that Persians actually settled in Palestine either before or after the conquests however Persian merchants definitely had presence since books talk about it.
 
By the way Arabs extensively used Persian names to describe buildings or professions and all the hospitals were called Maristans or Bemaristan
 
 
 
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