History Community ~ All Empires Homepage


This is the Archive on WORLD Historia, the old original forum.

 You cannot post here - you can only read.

 

Here is the link to the new forum:

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Forum LockedPakistan and Hindustan

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
Author
Afghanan View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar
Durr e Durran

Joined: 12-Jun-2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1076
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Afghanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Nov-2005 at 16:10
Originally posted by ScythianEmpire ScythianEmpire wrote:

Originally posted by Afghanan Afghanan wrote:

Originally posted by ScythianEmpire ScythianEmpire wrote:

Most of what you lot have said is complete nonsense.

Afghanan, I dont know why you go on about this Pakistani lady you know. Perhaps she has a point and is right, and you are not!!

Quote Differences between Pakistanis and Indians


Language/linguistics:

About 75% of languages spoken in Pakistan are Indo-Aryan and 24%
are Iranian, both part of the Indo-Iranian branch of Indo-European
family of languages. All languages of Pakistan are written in the
Perso-Arabic script, with significant vocabulary derived from Arabic
and Persian. Punjabi, Seraiki, Sindhi, Pashto, Urdu, Balochi,
Kashmiri, etc. are the languages spoken in Pakistan. 

About 70% of languages spoken in India are Indo-Aryan, 25% are
Dravidian, and 5% are Sino-Tibetan and Austro-Asiatic, all distinct
family of languages. Most languages in India are written in Brahmi-
derived scripts such as Devangari, Gurmukhi, Tamil, etc. Hindi,
Bengali, Gujarati, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Assamese,
Punjabi, and many others are the mother-tongue languages spoken in
each of India's states.

As you can see both countries have distinct linguistic identities.
Even in the case of Punjabi, while it is the mother-tongue of a
majority in Pakistan, it represents the mother-tongue of only 2%
Indians. Besides, Pakistani Punjabi (Western Punjabi) is distinct in
its vocabulary/dialect and writing script when compared to Indian
Punjabi (Eastern Punjabi).

In the case of Urdu/Hindi, while Hindi is the mother-
tongue of a majority in India, Urdu is the mother-tongue of only 8%
Pakistanis. Besides, they both are distinct languages, Urdu has a
writing script and strong vocabulary derived from Arabic and
Persian, whereas Hindi has strong vocabulary derived from Sanskrit
and is written in Devangari script.
Most Pakistanis can understand
English and watch American/Brit movies but that does not make them
British/American, same is the case with Hindi.

 



Scythian Empire, there is no question, I am right.  Hindi and Ordo are pretty much the same languages.  The only difference between them is that Ordo has many more Arabic and Persian loan words than Hindi, and its written in Perso-Arabic script.   They are relatively mutually intelligible languages and any Pakistani who claims otherwise is in denial.

 

Urdu might have a similar origin or grammar as Hindi (though the writing systems are totally different), but Hindi and Urdu (it's not Ordo which has a Turkish meaning) have more differences than just the scripting, many Hindi words come from Sanskrit, many Urdu words come from Persian. Hindi script is Devangari, Urdu scripting is Arabic (reflecting the need to communicate with  Arabs and Persians).

"Following the Mughal conquest of India and the resulting vast Islamic empire, especially in the northern and central regions of the subcontinent, a hybrid language of Arabic, Persian, and local dialects began to form around the 10th and 11th centuries CE, one that would eventually be known as Urdu (from a Turkish word meaning "tent", in allusion to the army barracks of visiting troops). It grew from the interaction of (often Persian-speaking) Muslim soldiers and native peoples. Soon, the Persian script and Nasta'liq form of cursive was adopted, with additional figures added to accommodate the Indian phonetic system, and a new language based on the subcontinent's grammar with a vocabulary largely divided between Persian (and indirectly some Arabic) and local Prakrit dialects. Elements peculiar to Persian, such as the enclitic ezâfe, and the use of the takhallus, were readily absorbed into Urdu literature both religious and secular.

While much of Urdu's vocabulary draws on Arabic and Persian, its grammar stems from its origins among the Prakrit-based Apabhramsa languages of the native peoples of India. Most of the basic vocabulary of Urdu, including grammatical particles, pronouns, and auxiliary verbs, developed in conjunction with Hindi from Prakrit precursors. Although Urdu and Hindi are separated by two completely different writing systems (Perso-Arabic script and Devanagari script, respectively) and formal vocabularies, the two language communities have been continuously connected by commerce and culture."

There's little doubting the Persian and Arabic influence on the Urdu language, as well as the Apabrahmsa origins (similar to Hindi origins). It's more an amalgamation of languages. I wouldnt class Urdu as Persian or Arabic, or Hindu/Sanskrit, it's just a mixture. But there is definitely significant Persian and Arabic input in it, anybody who does not agree is also in denial.  

What did you say that even remotely differed from what I said?  Just because it has Persian or Arabic influences doesn't make it an entirely 'different' language from Hindi or even 'unique' from Hindi.   The only thing that makes a language unique is its GRAMMAR.  In that sense, Hindi and Urdo are the SAME. 

Quote:

...It is only grammatical structure that can be said to characterize a language. No matter which writing system is used, no matter which vocabulary words are used, a language's grammar will follow regular and characteristic rules. These rules, which govern verb conjugation, noun declension, plural formation, syntax, etc., are largely consistent within a language but differ between languages. Thus a comparative study of these rules allows us to distinguish one language from another."  - Afroz Taj  (Urdu Through Hindi: Nastaliq With the Help of Devanagari )

--

Again I fail to see how I was wrong.  Any Pakistani who claims that their Urdu language is derived from "Arabic mixed with Persian"  is completely wrong.  As I said BEFORE, the two languages differ in script and having more borrowed words than one another, its base is exactly the same.

 

The perceptive man is he who knows about himself, for in self-knowledge and insight lays knowledge of the holiest.
~ Khushal Khan Khattak
Back to Top
ScythianEmpire View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 04-Nov-2005
Location: Pakistan
Status: Offline
Points: 105
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ScythianEmpire Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Nov-2005 at 01:39
Originally posted by Afghanan Afghanan wrote:

What did you say that even remotely differed from what I said?  Just because it has Persian or Arabic influences doesn't make it an entirely 'different' language from Hindi or even 'unique' from Hindi.   The only thing that makes a language unique is its GRAMMAR.  In that sense, Hindi and Urdo are the SAME. 

Quote:

...It is only grammatical structure that can be said to characterize a language. No matter which writing system is used, no matter which vocabulary words are used, a language's grammar will follow regular and characteristic rules. These rules, which govern verb conjugation, noun declension, plural formation, syntax, etc., are largely consistent within a language but differ between languages. Thus a comparative study of these rules allows us to distinguish one language from another."  - Afroz Taj  (Urdu Through Hindi: Nastaliq With the Help of Devanagari )

--

Again I fail to see how I was wrong.  Any Pakistani who claims that their Urdu language is derived from "Arabic mixed with Persian"  is completely wrong.  As I said BEFORE, the two languages differ in script and having more borrowed words than one another, its base is exactly the same.

No, they're not completely wrong. Urdu is derived from Arabic mixed with Persian (later), but also Sanskrit languages such as Prakrit (initially).

You can also try and get an Urdu literate person to read Hindi, but they wont get past the first word. The same person will be able to read bits of Persian, and Arabic.

Urdu might have a relatively similar grammar to Hindi (though each has modifications), such as verb positions being at the end of a sentence and so on, but that only shows that the language was initially created from Sanskrit (as was Hindi). It would genetically be classified as a Sanskrit language, but with some 40% of the words from Persian or Arabic it's been heavily modified and shares its derivation with these other languages. Also the writers and readers of Urdu would be more at home with Persian and Arabic than with Hindi, or at least pick it up faster.

There is this point of view too.

http://www.iranian.com/Opinion/2002/June/Urdu/ 

Back to Top
Afghanan View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar
Durr e Durran

Joined: 12-Jun-2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1076
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Afghanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Nov-2005 at 21:41

Quote Urdu is derived from Arabic mixed with Persian (later), but also Sanskrit languages such as Prakrit (initially).

Quote It would genetically be classified as a Sanskrit language, but with some 40% of the words from Persian or Arabic it's been heavily modified and shares its derivation with these other languages

If you believe it is genetically classified as Sanskrit then you automatically NULLIFY the argument made in your website referral.

Here is the Genetic Classification of Urdu:

Genetic classification: Indo-European
 Indo-Iranian
  Indo-Aryan
   Western Hindi languages
    Hindustani
     Urdu 

 

 

 

 

 

In one quote you say it is DERIVED from Arabic mixed with Persian then you leave in paranthesis: LATER.  

Again.  Dari is simply the courtly and written language of FARSI.   It was known as "Dari' by Kings in that region, and it was passed down as the national language of Afghanistan.  Dari and Farsi are written essentially the same for it to be a derivative of Dari it would have to retain its grammatical structure which it does NOT. 

This is the proper relationship: 

Urdu is a member of the Indo Aryan family of languages, which is in turn a branch of the Indo European family. It is part of a dialect continuum which extends across northern South Asia from Panjabi to Bengali. These idioms all have similar grammatical structures and a large portion of their vocabulary in common. Punjabi, for instance, is very similar to Urdu: Punjabi written in the Shahmukhi script can be understood by speakers of Urdu with a little difficulty, but spoken Punjabi has a very different phonology (pronunciation system) and cannot be easily understood by Urdu speakers. However, the language mostly closely linked to Urdu is Standard Hindi.

 

 

The perceptive man is he who knows about himself, for in self-knowledge and insight lays knowledge of the holiest.
~ Khushal Khan Khattak
Back to Top
thakur ayub ali View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 19-Jul-2008
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thakur ayub ali Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jul-2008 at 06:48
Originally posted by Afghanan Afghanan wrote:

Quote Urdu is derived from Arabic mixed with Persian (later), but also Sanskrit languages such as Prakrit (initially).

Quote It would genetically be classified as a Sanskrit language, but with some 40% of the words from Persian or Arabic it's been heavily modified and shares its derivation with these other languages

If you believe it is genetically classified as Sanskrit then you automatically NULLIFY the argument made in your website referral.

Here is the Genetic Classification of Urdu:

Genetic classification: Indo-European
 Indo-Iranian
  Indo-Aryan
   Western Hindi languages
    Hindustani
     Urdu 

 

 

 

 

 

In one quote you say it is DERIVED from Arabic mixed with Persian then you leave in paranthesis: LATER.  

Again.  Dari is simply the courtly and written language of FARSI.   It was known as "Dari' by Kings in that region, and it was passed down as the national language of Afghanistan.  Dari and Farsi are written essentially the same for it to be a derivative of Dari it would have to retain its grammatical structure which it does NOT. 

This is the proper relationship: 

Urdu is a member of the Indo Aryan family of languages, which is in turn a branch of the Indo European family. It is part of a dialect continuum which extends across northern South Asia from Panjabi to Bengali. These idioms all have similar grammatical structures and a large portion of their vocabulary in common. Punjabi, for instance, is very similar to Urdu: Punjabi written in the Shahmukhi script can be understood by speakers of Urdu with a little difficulty, but spoken Punjabi has a very different phonology (pronunciation system) and cannot be easily understood by Urdu speakers. However, the language mostly closely linked to Urdu is Standard Hindi.

 

 a mixture of hindi and urdu is known as oudhi which is a local dialect of the rural masses in and around lucknow which is roughly the area known as oudh of eartwhile british empire in 1857.



Edited by thakur ayub ali - 20-Jul-2008 at 06:51
Back to Top
Koshur View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 24-Jun-2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Koshur Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jul-2008 at 02:09
I'd like to add some things here if I may.

Firstly, I would like to let you know that I'm from the Indian controlled Kashmir, originating from the far north of the valley, thus I can speak koshur, balti and urdu (hindi is not taught or spoken in kashmir, even though it is a part of india, I can read urdu but cant read hindi), so dont go around calling me Pakistani etc. Now, I can understand most bollywood movies pretty well which are hindi, but at the same time when the hindi news comes on Doordarshan (national indian channel) I can only understand around 25% of what the woman is saying, because of all the really hard sanskrit words that have been brought into hindi over the past few decades, and since they aren't taught here, I don't understand them.

Now if you go back 40+ years, hindi and urdu were identical, but now, hindi has been changed too much and has a very high level of sanskrit in it, whereas urdu still has its old influences.

Also just look at this website :

 http://www.hindilearner.com/hindi_words0.html 

A normal Indian Kashmiri who can speak urdu wont understand 80% of that, I'm pretty sure that applies to Paki urdu speakers too. So as far as I'm concerned urdu and hindi are very closely related, but due to the changes brought about to them, are drifting further and further apart.

Also About Punjab and India/Pakistan, I've been to both, and would like to give my opinions; both are just as dirty, people are just as crude, and are pretty much identical with the only differnce being you see turbans in Indian side and not in the Paki side :/  (sorry I dont mean to generalise but I've had bad experiences on both sides). Islamabad was nice but was full of Pakhtuns, with all the Khan cloth houses and afghan shops/bakeries, reminded me of parts of Srinagar :S  Chandigarh was nice too.

P.S. Start the Kashmir debate, I'd love to see what a Pakistani & an Indian have to say about it.

P.P.S, I went to Azad kashmir too, its  been made into mini Punjab, they have nothing in common with us anymore, what did you guys to do them?? I know that they arent kashuri and that they are mostly pahari people but they arent even anything like the Paharis of Indian J&K, people didnt know what koshur was, never mind what it meant :(,  the food was all Punjabi, with all the rotis (chapatis), no Kashmiri nun tsai (pink tea) to be found anywhere, only milk tea etc :(.




Edited by Koshur - 21-Jul-2008 at 02:17
:o
Back to Top
Sparten View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar
Totalitarian Iconoclast

Joined: 18-Mar-2006
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 5009
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sparten Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jul-2008 at 05:39
Where did you go? Mirpur? Thats Jummu. Has more in common with Punjab, as Jummu has always. Most of the refugees from Kashmir in 1948 settled in the Northern part of the state.
 
You know Balti?
The Germans also take vacations in Paris; especially during the periods they call "blitzkrieg".
Back to Top
SpartaN117 View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 10-Dec-2006
Status: Offline
Points: 120
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SpartaN117 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13-Aug-2008 at 02:24
@Afghanan

You have such a blatant agenda that its not even funny. Stop pretending to be an all knowing God about Pakistanis. This is not an Afghan Supremacy site.
I just read through 4 pages of you drivel about Pakistanis being Indian. What does that even mean when you cant define what "Indian Culture" is?

Pakistanis are not Indian. And Pakistanis are not Arabs, or Middle Eastern either. Just because we are Muslim doesnt mean we are "acting Arab".

What you are confusing with "Indian Culture" is actually Pakistani Culture. i.e Muslim Punjabi culture, Sindhi Culture and Kashmiri Culture. The Pakistani independence in 1947 doesnt change the ancient culture and history of our people, so stop spewing meaning less statements about Pakistans 'creation'.

 

PakHub.Info
Reclaiming Pakistans Identity
Join Us
Back to Top
MarcoPolo View Drop Down
Pretorian
Pretorian
Avatar

Joined: 05-Jul-2007
Location: Planet Earth
Status: Offline
Points: 185
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarcoPolo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Aug-2008 at 01:07
There are many similarities between Urdu and Hindi which has allowed speaker(s) of both languages to be be somewhat conversant with each other in the oral sense (written forms of either language not) but I think an important point that needs to be made is that Urdu is mother tongue of less than 6% of Pakistani's and that 6% is represented by Refugees from South Asia (known as Muhajir's in Pakistan)..  The other 94% of Pakistani's have acquired it as a second and often third language.  It is by no means an indigenous language, for all intents and purpose the country could have chosen to remain with its official language(English) and encouraged the provincial languages (similar to Malaysia) or chose another language and it would still be be in a somewhat similar predicament.   The national language of Pakistan was arbitrarily chosen and in many ways, its not taken very seriously(hence the reason why many Pakistani's dont necessarily have that strong an affiliation with it).  At the time of independance the new government could just as easily chosen Persian, Turkish, Arabic or German for that matter, the point is, not too much thought was put into the choosing of a national language considering the greater more urgent and pressing issues that were affecting the nation at the time.
 
Urdu was installed as a lingua franca in the region that made up Pakistan not by the people themselves but rather by the British Colonial rulers who wanted to minimize the influence of Persia, and elsewhere on the western region of South Asia and to install a common language of communication throughout their vast south asian holdings.  The British where very much opposed to Persian and Persian influences on the region and they took many steps to systematically remove its traces from the region.  Asides from abolishing its use officially (it was used till the time of the SIkh Empire), they also personally re-wrote land ownership papers and marriage certicates (previously written in Persian) into Urdu; infact many of the policies in suppressing Persian and promoting Urdu are available publicly in the form of old British Colonial official letters and can be read to understand the inner workings of the British Raj.
 
  The Irony is that If Afghanistan were to have been strategically significant for the British during their colonial rule, it too would have been annexed and incorporated into their vast empire and they would also be speaking Urdu as their national language today.  At the time of independence, perhaps due to lack of foresight, Urdu was continued as a national language as a token of national unity and perhaps by the fact that many in the indepence movement were speakers of the language.  There are many Pakistani's who have even questioned its legality as the national language since it is a language that is not native to the country and taking history into account vis-a-vis the actions of British colonial rulers, would like the abolishment of it as a national language and the adoption of another national language in its stead be it a native Pakistani language(Pashto, Panjabi, SIndhi etc..), Arabic, English(already the official language of Pakistan) or simply a reversion to the previous lingua franca for the past several thousand years, Persian.  Whatever the case, the language issue is a sensitive issue within Pakistan itself, with many ethnic groups (notably the newly educated Panjabi)  who were very pro-active in learning urdu often over their own mother tongue, now toning down their initial ''enthusiasm'' and encouraging their kids to actively speak Panjabi for fear of losing their cultural and linguistic identity and losing contact with their roots for the past 3000 years.
 
Prior to the use of Urdu, Persian was the lingua franca of the region.  Its hold on the region was immense as most of its ancient monuments and texts are all written in that and other sub-related texts of Ancient Persian origin (Kharoshti, Aramaic etc..) unlike in india where Sanskrit was used.  Amongst educated circles, Persian is still held in high esteem in Pakistan and speakers of this language and respected and praised by all Pakistani's alike irrespective of ethnic, religious or cultural backgrounds.
 
To further complicate the matter more, in recent years, the Urdu spoken in Pakistan has further been evolving acquiring a particularly ''Pakistani Flavour'' while at the same time slowly absorbing more vocabularly from English, Pashto, Panjabi, SIndhi, Shina and even Baloch (i.e. from Pakistan's native languages) while the hindi in india has been heavily sanskritized and altered from the original hindustani that it evolved from.
 
Pakistan has and always will be a transitional region that has tilted many ways while at the same time maintaining its unique identity.  I has not gone the Turkish route(whereby all Anotolians, Greeks and inhabitants of Asia Minors are labelled as Turks) but continues to progress on its own unique way.  In many ways, Pakistan can learn from what Isreal has done, in that it chose to revive an ancient language (Hebrew)- a language that was only used in an ancient form by priests/rabbi's, modernize it, reform it with the help of many noted linguists and introduce modern new words into it to make it more practical, and promote it a succesful token of Israeli identity bringing together various disparing people(s) and a multiethnic nation which was bonded together only by religion but consisting of various ethnic groups, cultures and races and giving them a common language, this is something many critics say, Urdu has not done and failed to do in the case of Pakistan.


Edited by MarcoPolo - 14-Aug-2008 at 22:41
Back to Top
Nayyar Hashmey View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard


Joined: 24-Feb-2009
Location: Lahore
Status: Offline
Points: 0
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nayyar Hashmey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Feb-2009 at 10:04

The posture of Pakistan and Hindustan standing against each other is out-dated now. Same holds for the theory of ‘Akhand Bharat’ which too is dead. There is no use of "unearthing the dead out of their graves".

 We Pakistanis are very proud of our being Pakistanis, so should the Indian be. To find similarity between Indian and Pakistanis, there are many but there are also stark differences between the two. President Zardari of Pakistan went miles ahead when he talked of some India in every Pakistani and some Pakistan in every Indian. This sentiment needs to be translated into a fruitful economic and cultural cooperation

 The world today needs a common south Asian initiative on global matters. The present aggrandizement (a legacy of last 60 years existence of both as independent nations) needs to be discontinued. Both should collaborate so that a common south Asian initiative becomes a reality. This, however, is not possible until and unless our Indian friends discontinue the ‘Akhand Bharat’ dream.

 Pakistan inherits not only its Muslim identity; it also inherits its thousand years’ heritage of Indus valley civilization, a civilization which started 9000 years ago in Mehrgarh, Balochistan. Hinduism, Christianity and Islam came much later.

 Even word India itself is derived from Indus and the land around Indus (present Pakistan and the north western part of India including states of Rajasthan and Gujarat had been a part of this civilization. But this is the archeology and anthropology of Pakistan. The present geographical position of both nations can continue and should continue, but the two of these countries need to come together. Instead of fighting on things which divide us, we have so many common things, a common history, music, and poetry, so why not capitalize on good things and to nurture a permanent peace between India and Pakistan. Side by side both can gradually proceed to sort out their differences on various issues including Kashmir.

 Both countries got nothing out of these wars. Its high time that both now enter an era of peace and friendship.

 

Nayyar Hashmey

http://wondersofpakistan.blogspot.com/


Back to Top
Jallaludin Akbar View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 20-Jan-2009
Location: U.S.A!
Status: Offline
Points: 126
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jallaludin Akbar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Feb-2009 at 21:20
Originally posted by Nayyar Hashmey Nayyar Hashmey wrote:

The posture of Pakistan and Hindustan standing against each other is out-dated now. Same holds for the theory of ‘Akhand Bharat’ which too is dead. There is no use of "unearthing the dead out of their graves".

 We Pakistanis are very proud of our being Pakistanis, so should the Indian be. To find similarity between Indian and Pakistanis, there are many but there are also stark differences between the two. President Zardari of Pakistan went miles ahead when he talked of some India in every Pakistani and some Pakistan in every Indian. This sentiment needs to be translated into a fruitful economic and cultural cooperation

 The world today needs a common south Asian initiative on global matters. The present aggrandizement (a legacy of last 60 years existence of both as independent nations) needs to be discontinued. Both should collaborate so that a common south Asian initiative becomes a reality. This, however, is not possible until and unless our Indian friends discontinue the ‘Akhand Bharat’ dream.

 Pakistan inherits not only its Muslim identity; it also inherits its thousand years’ heritage of Indus valley civilization, a civilization which started 9000 years ago in Mehrgarh, Balochistan. Hinduism, Christianity and Islam came much later.

 Even word India itself is derived from Indus and the land around Indus (present Pakistan and the north western part of India including states of Rajasthan and Gujarat had been a part of this civilization. But this is the archeology and anthropology of Pakistan. The present geographical position of both nations can continue and should continue, but the two of these countries need to come together. Instead of fighting on things which divide us, we have so many common things, a common history, music, and poetry, so why not capitalize on good things and to nurture a permanent peace between India and Pakistan. Side by side both can gradually proceed to sort out their differences on various issues including Kashmir.

 Both countries got nothing out of these wars. Its high time that both now enter an era of peace and friendship.

 

Nayyar Hashmey

http://wondersofpakistan.blogspot.com/



well said...Thumbs Up
"First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win."
-Mahatma Gandhi

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.