History Community ~ All Empires Homepage


This is the Archive on WORLD Historia, the old original forum.

 You cannot post here - you can only read.

 

Here is the link to the new forum:

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Forum LockedNew Species Thread

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
Author
Windemere View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 09-Oct-2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 65
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jan-2009 at 22:13
Recently there was a program on television about a hunter, in 2006, shooting an odd-looking polar bear in Northwest Territories, Canada. It was a large white bear but it had dark-colored patches around its eyes and nose, very long claws, a humped back, and a dished (concave) face. Recently its DNA was analyzed, and it was found to be a hybrid between a male grizzly bear and a female polar bear. This is the first documented time that this sort of hybrid bear has been found in nature. Polar bears and grizzlies have different habitats and lifestyles and rarely encounter each other in nature, though it's possible for a wide-ranging grizzly to occasionally  venture out into polar bear habitat. They've never previously been known to breed with one another, though. Occasionally over the past hundred years odd -colored polar berss (yellowish or creme-colored) have been seen or shot, so its possible that hybrids occured previously without being recognized as such.
 
Zoos have occasionally produced polar-grizzly hybrids in the past, usually inadvertently, so it was known to be genetically possible, though this is the first time its been recorded to have occured naturally. (This animal wasn't a new species, just a hybrid between two species that don't usually come into contact with each other or interbreed).
 
Some further photos and information can be seen by googling "polar bear grizzly bear hybrid" and clicking on the Wikipedia and National Geographic websites.
Windemere
Back to Top
Dolphin View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar
Níl a fhios agam cad ata ag tharlu

Joined: 06-Feb-2007
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 1554
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Jan-2009 at 18:56
Hey Windemere, could the hybrid successfully breed, or was it sterile like an ass?


Am not I Dametas? Why, am not I Dametas?
Back to Top
Windemere View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 09-Oct-2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 65
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-Feb-2009 at 19:46
Dolphin,
 
Yes, the hybrid polar-grizzly bears born in zoos were fertile, and they were able to breed back with either species.  In the old days, zoos used to intentionally produce hybrid animals, such as lion-tiger hybrids. Nowadays, however, they don't encourage it, they're more interested in preserving the pure species. This event in Canada was the first time such a hybrid bear has ever been conclusively found out in nature, though.
Windemere
Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Webmaster
Webmaster
Avatar
AE Magazine Coordinator

Joined: 23-Oct-2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 3294
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Feb-2009 at 03:11
Some more exciting new species (though long-extinct) have been discovered recently, on an island off Britain. I've never thought of Britain as a prehistoric/fossil hotspot - usually its Central USA, Inner Mongolia or Northern Australia that spring to mind. But has been proven over the past decade, there are a plethora of prehistoric remains to be discovered in and around the British Isles.

Dinosaur hunters 'unearth 48 new prehistoric species'

London (PTI): Palaeontologists claim to have unearthed 48 new prehistoric species including dinosaurs, from cliffs of the Isle of Wight dubbed as Britain's Jurassic Park.

A team at the Portsmouth University, led by Dr Steve Sweetman, actually made the discovery during their painstaking search of what has been nicknamed the "Dinosaur Island" over a period of four years.

Their haul includes eight dinosaurs, six mammals and 15 different types of lizard dating back to 130 million years, all taken from cliffs of Isle of Wight, 'The Daily Telegraph' newspaper reported.

Highlights include the remains of a creature similar to a giant velociraptor -- similar in size to those portrayed in the 'Jurassic Park' film -- and pterosaurs and long-necked Sauropods like the massive Brachiosaurus, seen in the movie.

"It has taken me just four years of hard graft to make my discoveries. In the very first sample I found a tiny jaw of an extinct newt-sized, salamander-like amphibian and then new species just kept coming.

"Although we knew a lot about the larger species that existed on the island during the early Cretaceous, no-one had ever filled in the gaps.

"With these discoveries I can paint a really detailed picture of the creatures that scurried at the feet and in the shadows of the dinosaurs," the leading British daily quoted Dr Sweetman as saying.

In fact the Jurassic Island is thought to be one of the top five in the world for concentrations of dinosaurs remains.

Last year, a review of the species discovered on these islands identified 108 species since first fossil was found in 1824.

Source: http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/008200902101221.htm

Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Webmaster
Webmaster
Avatar
AE Magazine Coordinator

Joined: 23-Oct-2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 3294
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 07:36
I thought I'd post my 3000th post here in the Natural History Forum Smile

Scientists have recently discovered a carnivorous sea squirt 4km below the surface, in the Tasman fracture, south of Tasmania (Australia). It works in a similar fashion to a venus fly trap - if an unsuspecting shrimp crawls in, it gobbles it up. Here is an image:



The article is rather long, so here is a link to it. Enjoy!

http://www.popsci.com.au/environment/article/2009-02/diving-ancient-history-scientists-discover-new-species

Regards,

- Knights -

Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Baron
Baron


Joined: 04-May-2007
Location: Sweden
Status: Offline
Points: 479
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-May-2009 at 16:26
If you want to keep track of the species of the world this project is something to follow:
 
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFE
 
A new project to create an online reference source and database for every one of the 1.8 million species that are named and known on this planet.
 
 
Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Webmaster
Webmaster
Avatar
AE Magazine Coordinator

Joined: 23-Oct-2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 3294
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-May-2009 at 16:41
Yes, thanks for sharing, Carcharodon. It is certainly a great site Thumbs Up

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.