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Forum LockedInscription in Lenape language in Sweden

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    Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:00
Maybe the oldest inscription in the Lenape language is inscribed on the tombstone of the Swedish lutheran priest Johan Campanius (1601-1683) who some years lived and worked in the Swedish colony "Nya Sverige" (New Sweden) in todays Delaware, New Jersey och Pennsylvania. He finally returned to Sweden and was buried in the church of Frösthult in the county of Uppland.
 
The Swedish colony existed the years 1638 - 1655.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:09
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Maybe the oldest inscription in the Lenape language is inscribed on the tombstone of the Swedish lutheran priest Johan Campanius (1601-1683) who some years lived and worked in the Swedish colony "Nya Sverige" (New Sweden) in todays Delaware, New Jersey och Pennsylvania. He finally returned to Sweden and was buried in the church of Frösthult in the county of Uppland.
 
The Swedish colony existed the years 1638 - 1655.
 
The Lenape (len-a-pee) Indians lived near the present area of Philadelphia, and north of there, west of and along the Delaware River.  The name is still found in that area in place names, and names of schools, churches, etc. 
 
Evidently, they were to the south as well, as New Sweden was mostly in modern day Delaware.  I didn't know they were that far south.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:23
Originally posted by pikeshot1600 pikeshot1600 wrote:

The Lenape (len-a-pee) Indians lived near the present area of Philadelphia, and north of there, west of and along the Delaware River.  The name is still found in that area in place names, and names of schools, churches, etc.

Evidently, they were to the south as well, as New Sweden was mostly in modern day Delaware.  I didn't know they were that far south. 
 

Well, New Sweden was quite evenly spaced in Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey; there was at least two small forts in today's downtown Philadelphia (I think one of them is buried under a bridge over the Schuylkill).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:32
Originally posted by Styrbiorn Styrbiorn wrote:

Originally posted by pikeshot1600 pikeshot1600 wrote:

The Lenape (len-a-pee) Indians lived near the present area of Philadelphia, and north of there, west of and along the Delaware River.  The name is still found in that area in place names, and names of schools, churches, etc.

Evidently, they were to the south as well, as New Sweden was mostly in modern day Delaware.  I didn't know they were that far south. 
 

Well, New Sweden was quite evenly spaced in Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey; there was at least two small forts in today's downtown Philadelphia (I think one of them is buried under a bridge over the Schuylkill).
 
I see that from Wiki (OK, OK, I sometimes use it for quick reference Embarrassed ), and I thought that Ft. Christina was about as far north as they came...kind of like a bastion west of the Delaware.  Something else I didn't know.
 
 
 


Edited by pikeshot1600 - 27-Apr-2009 at 22:33
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:41
It seems that the indigenous peoples the Swedish of New Sweden came in most contact with was the Lenape people (often called the Delaware by Europeans) and the Susquehannocks (sometimes reffered to as Minkess).
It´s interesting that Lenapes many years later when they since long time had left (or rather been forced to leave) the area where New Sweden once was, still had a special positive word for whites, namely "Swannack". Most of the time they called the Europeans the more negative word "Wischtösit" (hope I got the spelling right) which means "hairy face". But "Swannack" meant a good people from across the sea. Some scholars think that "Swannack" comes from the word "svensk" which is swedish for the word Swede.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Apr-2009 at 22:53
Here is a map of New Sweden: 
 
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 05-Jun-2009 at 02:00
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2009 at 23:50
One can read about the Swedish meetings with the Lenape in:
 
Fur, Gunlög, 1993: Cultural Confrontations on Two Fronts. Contacts and conflicts with Lenape Indians in New Sweden and with Sami in Lapland in the 17th century
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-May-2009 at 22:45
There seem to have been some intermarriage between the Swedes (and Finns) and the Lenapes, and also in some degree with the Susquehannocks. Some of the Swedish priests and also the Swedish governor Johan Printz are complaining about what Printz called  "flykten till de vilske" (the escape to the wild ones, or to the heathens). Many of the Swedish (and Finnish - Swedish) farmers that married Native women also moved to their villages and adopted the native way of life.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-May-2009 at 23:17
Is there any picture of that inscription?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Jun-2009 at 00:03
 

I have seen one but I have been unable to find it on the internet. Maybe I just have to visit the church myself to take a photo.

 

The inscription says something like (in English translation): "Here rests a good chief who died at an advanced age". 

It seems that the inscription is written in a sort of pidgin language (Delaware Jargon) that was used for trading and other contacts between the Lenape and the Europeans.

 
There is also a translation of Martin Luthers Little Cateshism into this Delaware Jargon, published by Johan Campanius.
 
 
Johan Campanius also compiled a Vocabula Mahakuassica, a vocabulary of about 100 words of the language of the Susquehannocks. It is almost the only source to that language.
 
I think both these books are available in reprinted editions still today.
 
 
 
Jag ser att du har ett svenskt citat nederst i ditt inlägg Smile
 
 
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 01-Jun-2009 at 00:06
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Jun-2009 at 00:15
Here is a picture of the exterior of the church in which the tombstone with the inscrition is located:
 
 
 
Frösthults kyrka (church of Frösthult)
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 01-Jun-2009 at 00:17
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Jun-2009 at 00:09
It´s interesing to notice that the log cabin were introduced in America by the Swedish and Finnish settlers of New Sweden. Some of the first to embrace this kind of building were their Native neighbours the Lenape and the Susquehannocks.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-Jun-2009 at 00:44
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

 

The inscription says something like (in English translation): "Here rests a good chief who died at an advanced age".

 
The inscription in Delaware jargon goes something like this: Umar sachiman chinsika hacking haro ankarop machis chuki.
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