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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Nov-2006 at 20:27

Thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) Cloning Project:

The Australian Museum in Sydney began a project in 1999 reminiscent of the science fiction movie Jurassic Park. The goal was to use genetic material from specimens taken and preserved in the early 20th century to clone new individuals and restore the species from extinction. In late 2002 the researchers had some success as they were able to extract usable DNA from the specimens. On 2005-02-15, the museum announced that it was stopping the project after tests showed the specimens' DNA had been too badly degraded by the ethanol preservative. In May 2005, Professor Michael Archer, the University of New South Wales Dean of Science, former director of the Australian Museum and evolutionary biologist, announced that the project was being restarted by a group of interested universities and a research institute.

The International Thylacine Specimen Database (ITSD) was completed in April 2005 and is the culmination of a four year research project to catalogue and digitally photograph, if possible, all the known surviving specimen material held within museum, university and private collections of the Thylacine.

Source: Wikipedia

Good thoughts Hellios, I'm quite interested in looking into genetic projects regarding extinct/critically endangered animals. Shall continue research**

- Knights -

The image “http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b8/Thylacine.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Nov-2006 at 21:22
Musk Ox in northern Canada:
 
 
Existed since the ice age, rubbing shoulders with woolly mammoths.
 
The Alaska population was wiped out in the late 19th c. but Musk Ox have been reintroduced to Alaska, Sweden, Norway, and Russia.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Nov-2006 at 21:28
Wooly Mammoth:
 
 
Known from bones & frozen carcasses from Ireland to the east coast of North America with the best preserved carcasses in Siberia.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote omshanti Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Nov-2006 at 18:27
Originally posted by Styrbiorn Styrbiorn wrote:

Originally posted by omshanti omshanti wrote:

Talking of big cows, When the Europeans went to the Americas apparently there were 6 million ( please correct me if I am wrong with the numbers )bison in north America. They were very important animals to the native-American peoples and only because of this reason , were massacred  by the Europeans. Although they escaped extinction, today very small numbers of them survive in Canada.

They weren't massacred until the latter half of the 1800s when the American railroad companies started issuing the big money. You can hardly blame the Europeans for that...
 
You are right Styrbiorn. Thank you for correcting me . I am sorry for that mistake. My only information on bison  before writing that post was  based on two TV documentaries ( Planet earth BBC/UK and World heritage TBS/Japan) in which the history of bison was mentioned briefly. I should have searched more before writing.
Posted below  are the result of my seaching on internet.
 

Hide Tanning - National Archives PhotoMuch has been written concerning the economic value of the bison to the American Indian. The bison sustained a way of life, providing food, clothing, shelter, and fuel. Extermination of the bison spelled the doom of American Indian independence.

In 1800, it was estimated there were forty million bison, by 1883, there were no wild bison in the United States. By 1900, there were less than six hundred left in North America. The majority of the forty million animals were killed in a fifty-five year period, beginning in 1830. Many people denounced the slaughter; few did anything to stop it. Fortunately, a small, devoted group of conservationists managed to save a few hundred. The bison we see and enjoy today were raised from these few survivors. 
 
 
I found this picture in Wikipedia.
 
Pile of bison skulls, 1870s
Enlarge
Pile of bison skulls, 1870s


Edited by omshanti - 15-Nov-2006 at 18:41
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Nov-2006 at 20:43
An animal on its way to becoming 'history' in Canada is the polar bear.
 
 
According to recent studies, they'll be gone within a few decades.
 
 
In order to get from one food source to another, polar bears must cross large bodies of water using floating ice patches as resting points; with global warming these floating ice patches (resting points) are disappearing so bears are drowning due to exhaustion.  They can swim really long distance without stopping, but they still need those ice patches to stop & rest.
 
 
 
We're also messing up the polar bear's food chain; fish stocks, seals, etc.
 
Some people still hunt them.
 
 
 


Edited by Hellios - 15-Nov-2006 at 20:45
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ponce de Leon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Nov-2006 at 21:57
i dont believe wooly mammoths ever exsisted. It is all just propoganda
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Nov-2006 at 23:16
I think the genetic distinction has also been proven, but anyhow, they're still a bit too big for elephants!
 
At the Canadian Museum of Natural History in Ottawa:
 
 
An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, have successfully sequenced a portion of the genome of the extinct species.
 
For more information, please contact:
 
McMaster University.
Hendrik Poinar, Associate Professor, Anthropology & Paleontology.
Tel: 905-741-0896.
 
McMaster University.
Jane Christmas, Office of Public Relations.
Tel: 905-525-9140 ext. 27988.
 
 
Dr. Dick Mol, paleontologist in Holland, and Bernard Buigues, curator of the Mammoth Museum in Siberia, examine (below) the remains of a woolly mammoth, recovered from ice & preserved.
 
 
Frozen head of a 10,000 year old woolly mammoth at a lab freezer at a research facility in Yakutsk, Russia:
 
 
This specimen (below) is over 4 meters high, 3.6 meters long, with tusks 2.4 meters long.  It's located at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse, Canada:
 
 
This woolly mammoth tusk (below) kinda big for an elephant:
 
 
This fossil assembly (below) can be discussed with Dr. Adrian Lister of University College London and Dr. Andrei V. Sher of the Russian Academy of Sciences:
 
 
Woolly mammoth are about as proven as the dinosaurs.
 
Excavations in the United States:
 
 


Edited by Hellios - 16-Nov-2006 at 01:55
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 03:08
Originally posted by Eondt Eondt wrote:

The wolf was once one of the most wide-spread and successful predators on the planet, until almost driven to extinction by man.
 

True.

 

Wolf packs keep deer herds strong/healthy by targeting the weak/sick.  Once the wolves disappear, sickness spreads more quickly within the deer herds, and with nothing to weed out the weaklings the herds become generally weaker also, resulting in fewer of them surviving harsh winters.

 

Lone wolves keep rodent populations under control.  Some Canadian farmers thought they were smart by exterminating lone wolves but then the rodent populations went out of control.

 

Farmers should just build more secure fences, pens, enclosures, but that's expensive, and shepherding also requires resources, so they just wipe out the wolves.

 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote omshanti Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 08:09
The wolf is such a beautifull animal. If my memory is right they are one of the very few spiecies who keep one partner for their whole life.
 
It is so shocking that the Polar bears are going to be history in few decades. Is there absolutely nothing to do to stop their extinction?
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Adalwolf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 16:48
Originally posted by omshanti omshanti wrote:

The wolf is such a beautifull animal. If my memory is right they are one of the very few spiecies who keep one partner for their whole life.
 
It is so shocking that the Polar bears are going to be history in few decades. Is there absolutely nothing to do to stop their extinction?
 
 


Well, if the world came together and tried to stop, or limit global warming, they may survive.

Besides that keeping some in Zoo's, and get genetic material from as many individuals as possibe so they can be cloned in the future are two other alternatives.

Ending global warming would be the best solution, however.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 20:12
 
There's a link at the bottom to download the full report of pdf.
 
 
 


Edited by Hellios - 16-Nov-2006 at 20:19
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 21:21

On the topic of Endangered animals;

Number of described species Number of species evaluated in 2006 Number of threatened species in 1996/98 Number of threatened species in 2000 Number of threatened species in 2002 Number of threatened species in 2003 Number of threatened species in 2004 Number of threatened species in 2006 Number threatened in 2006, as % of species described Number threatened in 2006, as % of species evaluated**
Vertebrates  
Mammals 5,416 4,856 1,096 1,130 1,137 1,130 1,101 1,093 20% 23%
Birds 9,934 9,934 1,107 1,183 1,192 1,194 1,213 1,206 12% 12%
Reptiles 8,240 664 253 296 293 293 304 341 4% 51%
Amphibians* 5,918 5,918 124 146 157 157 1,770 1,811 31% 31%
Fishes 29,300 2,914 734 752 742 750 800 1,173 4% 40%
Subtotal 58,808 24,284 3,314 3,507 3,521 3,524 5,188 5,624 10% 23%

Source: IUCN Red List 2006
 
And onto Polar Bears;
 
Polar bears rely almost entirely on the marine sea ice environment for their survival so that large scale changes in their habitat will impact the population. Global climate change posses a substantial threat to the habitat of polar bears. Recent modeling of the trends for sea ice extent, thickness and timing of coverage predicts dramatic reductions in sea ice coverage over the next 50–100 years. Sea ice has declined considerably over the past half century. Additional declines of roughly 10–50% of annual sea ice are predicted by 2100. The summer sea ice is projected to decrease by 50–100% during the same period. In addition the quality of the remaining ice will decline. This change may also have a negative effect on the population size. The effects of sea ice change are likely to show large differences and variability by geographic location and periods of time, although the long term trends clearly reveal substantial global reductions of the extent of ice coverage in the Arctic and the annual time frames when ice is present.
Also, while the polar ice caps are melting as a result of global warming, the climatic conditions above the Arctic Circle are being greatly varied. With average temperatures rising, Polar Bears are influenced by the misconception of time and season. Many Polar Bears are not even hibernating at all because it is just too warm! This has a drastic effect on the natural cycle and functioning of the Tundra/Arctic Ecosystem. Thumbs Down
 
Thought I'd include FURTHER photos, because they are such stunning animals Approve
 
 
 
 
*stay tuned*
 
- Knights -
 
PS. Thumbs Up Hellios

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Nov-2006 at 22:45

Sorry for changing the direction of the thread, but I'm curious, what is/are everyone's favourite animals, living or extinct?

 
My personal favourites are the big cats, which you have probably already gathered Approve
But if I had to pick one it would have to be the Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia). The majesty and regal nature of this amazing creature has entranced me since I was young. They are mysterious and elusive killers.
 
 
 
 
 

Snow leopard growling

Snow leopard cub

 
- Knights -
 
Big smile


Edited by Knights - 16-Nov-2006 at 22:58

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vivek Sharma Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Nov-2006 at 22:03
At least one thread which is free of wars.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2006 at 17:27
And that's how it should stay Approve

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ponce de Leon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Nov-2006 at 11:44
Originally posted by Hellios Hellios wrote:

I think the genetic distinction has also been proven, but anyhow, they're still a bit too big for elephants!

 

At the Canadian Museum of Natural History in Ottawa:

 


 

An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, have successfully sequenced a portion of the genome of the extinct species.

 


For more information, please contact:

 

McMaster University.

Hendrik Poinar, Associate Professor, Anthropology & Paleontology.

Tel: 905-741-0896.


 

McMaster University.

Jane Christmas, Office of Public Relations.

Tel: 905-525-9140 ext. 27988.


 

[IMG]height=395 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_221542_3.jpg" width=596>

 

Dr. Dick Mol, paleontologist in Holland, and Bernard Buigues, curator of the Mammoth Museum in Siberia, examine (below) the remains of a woolly mammoth, recovered from ice & preserved.

 

[IMG]height=429 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_221923_7.jpg" width=680>

 

Frozen head of a 10,000 year old woolly mammoth at a lab freezer at a research facility in Yakutsk, Russia:

 

[IMG]height=275 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_223503_3.jpg" width=412>

 

This specimen (below) is over 4 meters high, 3.6 meters long, with tusks 2.4 meters long.  It's located at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse, Canada:

 

[IMG]height=227 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_223934_3.jpg" width=250>

 

This woolly mammoth tusk (below) kinda big for an elephant:

 

[IMG]height=190 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_224529_3.jpg" width=290>

 

This fossil assembly (below) can be discussed with Dr. Adrian Lister of University College London and Dr. Andrei V. Sher of the Russian Academy of Sciences:

 

[IMG]height=203 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_225033_3.jpg" width=263>

 

Woolly mammoth are about as proven as the dinosaurs.

 

Excavations in the United States:

 

[IMG]height=526 src="http://www.allempires.com/forum/uploads/20061115_231137_3.jpg" width=373>

 


Are you kidding me? You can so easily duplicate those fossils with chicken bones. It surprises me how creative these con-artists are.
    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Nov-2006 at 21:57
Originally posted by Ponce de Leon Ponce de Leon wrote:

Are you kidding me? You can so easily duplicate those fossils with chicken bones. It surprises me how creative these con-artists are.
 
LOL Ponce de Leon believes mammoths are a hoax LOL LOL LOL sorry but it's very funny. Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Nov-2006 at 22:26
Originally posted by Knights Knights wrote:

Sorry for changing the direction of the thread, but I'm curious, what is/are everyone's favourite animals, living or extinct? 
 
Thanks for the snow leopard material; what a precious animal!
 
My 'favorite' (since you ask) are bears.  Mainly polar & grizzly.
 
Polar are bigger, but their bodies are designed for aquatic & sub-aquatic efficiency, they're more water dynamic, and aerodynamic to withstand freezing polar winds.
 
Grizzly bears are smaller, but their bodies are designed in a way that makes them better fighters, which is why grizzly bears are known to chase away polar bears that venture too far south.
 
Grizzly bears have very long claws (6 inches) and their upper body is designed for strong swipes (probably to break small trees) with huge upper body muscles.  Their shoulders & skulls are massive.
 
In the 19th century, North American west coasterners staged animal fights with grizzly bears brought from Alaska (the Kodiaks) against different animals, including imported animals from other continents, and the Kodiaks totally demolished anything their size, although if elephants were imported things would be different, but there are no historical records of Kodiaks vs elephants; only other grizzlies, polars, bulls, jaguars, lions, tigers, gorillas, buffalo, and that's all I can remember from numerous sources.
 


Edited by Hellios - 26-Nov-2006 at 22:46
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hellios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Nov-2006 at 23:14
Look at this idiot hunting an endangered animal.  Just 1 swipe from the grizzly would be nice for him.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Nov-2006 at 02:00
yes I agree...tool...*swipe*
Thanks for your post on grizzlies and polars...tis good to learn more stuff about those 2 amazing [cuddly LOL] creatures. We got 2 kodiak females at the zoo, and even though they are kept at a smaller wieght and are very old, they are still they giant...I think they wiegh in at around 250kg last time I checked. I'll try get some pictures of them.

Here we go; this is a pic of Bethel the Kodiak about 6 months ago. She is 28 years old - very old!



- Knights -




Edited by Knights - 27-Nov-2006 at 02:22

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