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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ArmenianSurvival Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jul-2005 at 01:20
Armenia  had a queen named Erato sometime before Christ.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hormoz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jul-2005 at 05:36

Persia:  the Grand Admiral of King Xerxes' fleet, as well as queen of the satrapy of Cilicia, was a woman named Artemisia.

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yiannis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jul-2005 at 05:47
Originally posted by Hormoz Hormoz wrote:

Persia:  the Grand Admiral of King Xerxes' fleet, as well as queen of the satrapy of Cilicia, was a woman named Artemisia.

She was not the admiral of the fleet, she only commanded the ships that she contributed to the Persian fleet.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Raider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jul-2005 at 05:50

 

Do you think that queens are usually more peacul rulers than kings?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Maju Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jul-2005 at 19:34
Navarre had many queens in the last centuries of existence as inependent country, sadly at that time my part of the country had already been annexed by Castile.

1274-1305 Joan I of Navarre - seeking protection against Castilian and Aragonese intervention she married Philip IV of France, uniting the dynasties for some time. The French kings ruled ignoring the Laws of the Country.
1328-49 Joan II of Navarre - she would have also reigned in France would there had not been for the Salic law, that succession gave birth to the Hundred Years' War. With her, French and Navarrese dynasties get separated for about two centuries. This was a relief for Navarre, which was in constant uprising against French centralism.
1425-41 Blanche of Navarre - she comitted the error of marrying two successive heirs of the crown of Aragon, what would be pretext for future intervetion of that kingdom into the sovereign affairs of Navarre. Her children were all killed on orders of their own father, who had other projects in mind.
1479 Blanche II and Eleanor of Navarre, both successively killed by their father, John of Aragon.
1483-1516 Catherine of Navarre - she witnessed the loss of most of its territories to the Spanish invaders (see John of Albret, her husband). She gave protection to Cesare Borgia, the ill-fated son of the infamous Pope Alexander VI, who died defending Biana. Borgia, married within the Foix family, had given protection to Navarre before when in more powerful position.
1555-1572 Jeanne d'Albret - mother of Henry III of Navarre and IV of France, reigned only in the north. She introduced Calvinism in the kingdom and favored the Huguenots of France. She is the last monarch of Navarre only, her son and grandson would be also kings of France and later Navarre would be absorbed by this much larger state.

Unlike in France and other places, Navarrese right allowed women to inherit the throne and all monarchs were subject to public oath of the parlamentary Laws of the Kingdom, custom that has continued till present day in most of its former territories.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bilge_Kagan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jul-2005 at 14:17
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Do you think that queens are usually more peacul rulers than kings?

 

Yes we can say that, because women are the best in diplomacy ( not only in politics, look at around, all of the " intelligent women " are really good diplomats ( really they can make somebody to believe something easily, i know because i seperated from my girlfriend ). So if they rule, they can easily solve something by  talking  , not by fighting... ( you know russian female ruler Katerina was "talking" (!) very good, so she could save her army from "Baltaci Mehmet Pasha" - only joking, i will post something "real" about this event- ) ) Intelligent women rule this way but, if all the women or a stupid woman rule, we can say " that's the most bad thing ". Let's have a look at some events about Turkey...

When "Tansu Ciller" time, an american dolar was nearly "16000" Turkish lira ( i know it's very high, but wait... ), tansu ciller was an economist but she was really stupid that "1000000 +" Turkish lira became 1 usd. She made a lot of mistakes and made our people really poor.

 

And Ottoman Empire, one of our wars with the " Safevis " is the subject. This time of Ottoman empire is "women rule" time ( you know; mother sultans, harem etc. ). Ottoman army defeated Safevi army but they wanted from Safevis only " Watermelons and Silk ". That shows us if women rule, what can happen. ( by the way, i cannot remember name of the war... )

These were only little examples about bad events. Not all of the woman rulers bad ( for example Tomris, Mumtaz Mahal ( ruler was Shah Cihan but he was asking about everything to his wife ), Margaret Thatcher etc... ) I think, we shouldn't break reality of the nature; "Man Rules !"

Ey Turk budunu ! Sozumu iit ! Saglamca dinle ! Ustte Gok Basmasa. Altta Yer Delinmese Ilini Toreni Kim Bozabilir ? Titre ve Kendine gel !

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vulkan02 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Jul-2005 at 19:49
Yes women have successfully brought a "peaceful" civilization today. But it only is getting worse and worse everyday as males tries to vent their lost power throught different sources that show our civilization is decadend. In the U.S. feminism has practically destroyed the family and rasised the instability in society to new heights. I believe this is one of the reasons why the U.S. is in such a domestic crisis today. Multiculturalism is another byproduct of the liberalism that has gripped the easter half on the U.S and coupled with the Jewish owned media it is really destroying America. Not that I am a fervent conservative but if you live in the U.S. and especially New York where the white population is disappearing this is painfully obvious.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oodog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Jul-2005 at 14:56

The first and only empress in Chinese history was Wu Zetian (625-705). She was a cruel woman. but generally speaking, as the ruler of the Tang Empire, she did a good job. Besides, there were over a dozen of queens served as regents in many dynasties. They made the contemporery emperors puppets.

Empress Wu Zetian

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote demon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Jul-2005 at 16:17

Korea had Sunduk queen(632~646, 27th "king" of Shilla) during shilla:

Her name was duckman.  She entered in the reign where the three korean states (koguryo, bekjae, shilla) were fighting fiercely, and made ties with Tang, strengthening national security.  She also encouraged the smart ones in religion, politics, mathematics, and science to lead the nation.  Like she was the founding "father" to korean unification.

During her era, she ordered the building of the "chum-sung-de" to observe stars and constellations. 

It's mathematical in that there  are 12 founding stones, 30 stones high, all these mathematical measurements, and most important of all, 366 stones (actually its 365 stones and one half stone- the half stone got lost or something) in total. 

Myung sung hwang hoo- last queen of Korea.  She came to power in 16, tried to gain power, brought the three border nations to korea, and was assasinated in the hands of japanese end. 

[img]http://cont1.edunet4u.net/soo9443/images/meyngsung.jpg[/img]

That's like the two main queens in Korea. 

Grrr..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote magdala Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Oct-2005 at 14:09
In Serbia there was not crowned queens like other countries, but there were female rulers. Ljubica was wife of duke Milosh Obrenovic. She was very important in state bussines(mostly because her husband did't know to read and write). She even killed (with her own hands) one of his mistresses who became too important. And there was Draga Mashin, wife of king Aleksandar Obrenovic. Eventually, she lead him to death in 1903, because he married her even tough she was divorced, and because she could't have children. There was also Jelena, wife of king Urosh the First, who was the dauther of a french duke. She was very beautifil, and her husband made her a beautiful garden and castle. Another Jelena, was the sister of a bulgarian king, and she was married to a king (later emperor) Dushan the Great(grandson of Urosh the First and Jelena). She was very influental, but she made a crutial mistake: she prosveded her husband to help John Kantakuzen to get to a Byzintian throne. At first he try to help him, but finally when he refused John found an aliance in Turkish tribes. He brought them to Balkans. Dushan saw the danger, and he asked the pope to help him evict the nonchristians. The pope refused. Turks ruled the Balkans for almost 7 centuries. All thanks to Jelena.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ok ge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Oct-2005 at 13:26

Zenobia (or Xenobia) is the name commonly used for the daughter of (= "bat" or "bath") Zabaai ben Selim. The widow of Septimius Odenathus, she reigned as Queen of Palmyra from 267 to 272 as regent for her infant son Vabalathus. Something of a militant, she embarked on a campaign of conquests that eventually saw her as the ruler of much of Syria and Asia Minor. By playing off Persia to the east against Rome to the west, she hoped to dominate them both.

In 269, she crushed an Egyptian who challenged Roman rule and proclaimed herself Queen of Egypt. She claimed to be descended from Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Mark Antony (and many modern historians believe she was), as well as Dido (the supposed founding queen of Carthage, according to the Aeneid) and declared herself the political heiress of both.

The Roman emperor Aurelian led a military campaign that resulted in the conquest of her kingdom in 272. Zenobia was captured and paraded wearing gold chains in Aurelian's Triumph (274). She was granted a villa in Tibur (now Tivoli, Italy), where she spent the rest of her life as a philosopher and socialite. Some historians (ancient and modern) believe she married a Roman senator and that they had children, so the line continued at least into the 4th century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zenobia

Queen Zenobia's Last Look upon Palmyra, Herbert G. Schmalz
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mamikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jan-2006 at 23:21
An interesting fact. Queen Victoria I of United Kingdom (ruled  1837 - 1901) was a descendant of King Geroge I, who was a direct descendant of King Tigranes II (Tigranes the Great) of Armenia, who died in 56 BC. Tigranes the Great was the 57th Great Grandfather of George I. No joke, check it out yourselves.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s010/f1772 62.htm

you can trace your family too
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ponce de Leon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jan-2006 at 22:39
I think Europe is making a big step forward with a conservative in power in Germany. Now just a few more leftist socialists to knock out starting with..lets say.... Jacques Chirac!!!!!!!!!!!
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Chirac is tory and you are off topic. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ulixes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jan-2006 at 16:46

In Sweden there were a 2 female rulers which the people of Sweden counts are real rulers. There were many other queens but they did not govern the country.:

1.

Christina of Sweden

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  Swedish Royalty
  
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Gustav I
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   Prince Carl Philip
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Christina

Christina (Kristina) (December 8, 1626 April 19, 1689), later known as Maria Christina Alexandra and sometimes Count Dohna, was Queen regnant of Sweden from 1632 to 1654. She was the only legitimate child of King Gustav II Adolf. As the heiress presumptive she succeeded her father to the throne of Sweden upon his death at the Battle of Ltzen (November 6, 1632) during Sweden's intervention in Germany in the Thirty Years' War.

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< =text/> //

Early life

Christina was born in Stockholm and the birth occurred during a rare astrological conjunction that fueled great speculation on what influence the child, fervently hoped to be a boy, would have later on the world stage. Reportedly she was so hairy and large that the midwives in fact prematurely called out that a boy had been born [1]. Her gender identity was never clear cut. She was educated in the manner typical of men, and frequently wore men's clothes (such as dresses with short skirts, stockings and shoes with high heels - all these features being useful when not riding pillion). This has caused her to later become an icon of the transgendered community. During the 20th century, her grave was opened so that her death mask could be examined. While the grave was open, a team of scientists examined her bones in an attempt to determine if she was intersexual, but they were not able to come to a clear conclusion.

Queen Christina's mother, Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg, came from the Hohenzollern family. She was a woman of quite distraught temperament, and her attempts to bestow guilt on Christina for her difficult birth, or just the horror story itself, may have prejudiced Christina against the prospect of having to produce a heir to the throne.

Her father gave orders that Christina should be brought up as a prince. Even as a child she displayed a precociousness that astonished the brilliant philosopher Descartes, who had been invited from France to tutor her.

Queen regnant

(N.B. all Swedish Monarchs are styled King. Kung denoting Monarch Regnant, Drottning denoting Queen Consort.)

The Crown of Sweden was inherited in the family of Vasa, and from Charles IX's time excluding those Vasa princes who had been traitors or descend from deposed monarchs. Gustav Adolph's younger brother had died years ago, and therefore there were only females left. Despite of the fact that there were living female lines descended from elder sons of Gustav I Vasa, Christina was the heiress presumptive.

National policy was directed during the first half of Christina's reign by her guardian, regent and adviser Axel Oxenstierna, chancellor to her father and until her majority in 1644 the principal member of the governing regency council. As ruler, Christina resisted demands from the other estates (clergy, burgesses and peasants) in the Riksdag of the Estates of 1650 for the reduction of tax-exempt noble landholdings.

Abdication

Christina came under the influence of Catholics and then abdicated her throne on June 5, 1654 in favour of her cousin Charles Gustavus in order to either practice openly her previously secret Catholicism, or to accept the same publicly so as to be at the center of a scientific and artistic renaissance.

The sincerity of her conversion has been disputed. Actually, in the eyes of her critics, there were many causes which might ostensibly have predisposed her to what was, after all, anything but an act of self-renunciation. First of all she could not have ignored the increasing discontent with her arbitrary and wasteful ways. Within ten years she had created 17 counts, 46 barons and 428 lesser nobles; to provide these new peers with adequate appanages, she had sold or mortgaged crown property representing an annual income of 1,200,000 riksdaler. There were clear signs that Christina was growing weary of the cares of what remained a provincial government; even if with large conquered territory.

Political contributions

The importunity of the senate and Riksdag on the question of her marriage was a constant source of irritation. In retirement she could devote herself wholly to art and science, and the opportunity of astonishing the world by the unique spectacle of a great queen, in the prime of life, voluntarily resigning her crown, strongly appealed to her vivid imagination. It is certain that towards the end of her reign she behaved as if she were determined to do everything in her power to make herself as little missed as possible. From 1651 there was a notable change in her behaviour. She cast away every regard for the feelings and prejudices of her people. She ostentatiously exhibited her contempt for the Protestant religion. Her foreign policy was flighty to the verge of foolishness. She contemplated an alliance with Spain, a state quite outside the orbit of Sweden's influence, the first fruits of which were to have been an invasion of Portugal. She utterly neglected affairs in order to plunge into a whirl of dissipation with her foreign favorites. The situation became impossible, and it was with an intense feeling of relief that the Swedes saw her depart, in masculine attire, under the name of Count Dohna.

Setting off to Rome

Upon conversion she took a new name Maria Christina Alexandra and moved to Rome, where her wealth and former position made her a centre of society. Her status as the most notable convert to Catholicism of the age, and as the most famous woman at the time (even exceeding Elizabeth I of England), made it possible for her to ignore or flout the most common requirements of obeisance to the Catholic faith. She herself remarked that her Catholic faith was not of the common order; indeed, before converting she had queried from church officials how strictly she would be expected to obey the church's common observances, and received reassurances.

While in Rome, she engaged in numerous world-political intrigues, particularly in concert with the Catholic Church's clandestine group of troubleshooters, the squadrones volantes. Growing wearied of acting behind the scenes in her later years, she made several attempts to gain the crown of a country, even launching an abortive attempt to reclaim the Swedish throne.

She left her large and important library to the Papacy on her death (April 19, 1689).

She is only one of four women to be given the honour of being buried in the crypt of St. Peter's Basilica, alongside the remains of the popes. A monument to her was carved later on and adorns a column close to the permanent display of Michelangelo's Piet.

Heritage

Christina's reign was controversial, and literature circulated during her lifetime that described her as participating in multiple affairs with both men and women. This, along with the emotional letters that she wrote to female friends, has caused her to become an icon for the lesbian community.

The complex character of Christina has inspired numerous plays, books, and operatic works, including the classic feature film Queen Christina in 1934. It starred another complex female Swedish character who was herself suspected of being lesbian Greta Garbo. Another feature film, The Abdication starred the Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann, and was based on a play by Ruth Wolff.

See also


Preceded by:
Gustav II Adolf
Monarch of Sweden
16321654
Succeeded by:
Charles X

 

2.

Ulrika Eleonora of Sweden

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Ulrika EleonoraQueen regnant of Sweden
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Ulrika Eleonora

Ulrika Eleonora (February 23, 1688 November 24, 1741) was Queen regnant of Sweden from November 30, 1718, to February 29, 1720, and then Queen consort until her death. The youngest child of King Charles XI and Queen Ulrike Eleonora, she was named after her mother. Upon the untimely and debated death of her brother, King Charles XII, at Fredrikshald on November 30, 1718, the succession discussions ultimately ended up in her favour, after she had accepted to abolish the absolute monarchy.

In 1715 she had married Landgrave Friedrich I of Hesse-Kassel, whose counsel she constantly sought in political matters. She even wanted him to officially become co-regent, but this was not allowed, and instead she abdicated in his favour after just one year of reign. Friedrich succeeded her on the Swedish throne as King Frederick I. Queen Ulrika Eleonora died of smallpox in 1741 after a childless marriage. The reigns of Ulrika Eleonora and her husband saw the birth of the era of Swedish history that is traditionally called the Age of Liberty, where the monarch had to give up most of his power to the aristocracy.

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Preceded by:
Charles XII
Monarch of Sweden
17181720
Succeeded by:
Frederick I
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ellinas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jan-2006 at 15:47

During Byzantine period the women rulers we had were empress Zoi, empress Theodora and Irene the Athenian.

Greece had no other women rulers before or after the Byzantine era.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2006 at 18:27
the Ottomans had a female ruler too, it whas iirc her name Hurrem Sultan, she ruled trough his husband first then later through her sons. She had a great influence in the Ottomans, also a detail she whas from Greek origin
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bleda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2006 at 18:32
hurrem wasnt greek origin she was russians
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2006 at 19:27
Originally posted by bleda bleda wrote:

hurrem wasnt greek origin she was russians

then it whasnt Hurrem, sorry cant remember her name.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penelope Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Aug-2008 at 09:54

I recently discovered that the kingdoms of Nubia had more ruling Queens(Queens who ruled by themselves) than any other civilization in history.

The direct use of force is such a poor solution to any problem, it is generally employed only by small children and large nations.
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