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Forum Lockeddid genghis khan invade india?

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Omar al Hashim View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Omar al Hashim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jan-2009 at 22:58
Originally posted by Cheeta Cheeta wrote:

At that time India was ruled by a simple and just Turkish ruler Shamsuddin Iltutmush. He has been credited being the wise man to make his country escape the Mongol savage. The envoy of Changiz sent to India was honoured and well received by him and were returned with gifts for the Khaqan. The envoy returned make Changiz Khan satisfied to return from the other side of Indus. Some say that the discipline and strength of the army of Iltutmush made the Great Khan reluctant to attack but seems that the better treatment, simpler and courteous manner and the unity and discipline all made the Khaqan so impressed to return not attacking his domain. Shamsuddin Iltutmush was a simple Muslim and there was no pomp and show in his court, the common people were equally well treated which might have attracted the simple minded Mongol.

'India' wasn't ruled by Iltumish, just the area surrounding Delhi and Uttar Pradesh. Even Bihar and Bengal which formed part of Muhammed Ghur's (Iltumish's owner) empire was ruled by the Khilji clan, other slaves of Muhammed. Ghenghis didn't attack Iltumish because they didn't share a border, he never got that far. It was because of Chenghis's devestation of the Indus vally kingdoms that allowed Iltumish to easy annex them to his kingdom afterwards.
Quote Changhiz Khan had lost his son in Bamyan province of Afghanistan where there was a battle fought between Sultan Jalaluddin and his son Shegi kutuku. The Mongol army was defeated by the allied force of Turks, Persians and Afghans.

Didn't the mongols win Bamiyan? Genghis's son was killed, and in vengence he slaughter the whole population of the valley, and settled 1000 mongol troops there (Hazara). I think you are thinking of the Battle of Parwan, not Bamiyan.
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Good information.  Do we know in which present area did this battle take place, towns or cities?

It is supposed to be near the village of Hund.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hund
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bernard Woolley Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jan-2009 at 02:04

Originally posted by dud dud wrote:

Originally posted by Bernard Woolley Bernard Woolley wrote:

There's more than enough evidence that this happened, on what basis does anyone doubt it?

Really? I've never heard of this. What is the proof?

Basically, the proof is that it's in all of the chronicles. Here's Juvaini (History of the World-Conqueror, Chapter XIV):

"The Sultan's strength was broken by his defection and the highway of honour and success closed to him. He made for Ghaznin with the intention of crossing the Indus, and Chingiz-Khan, wo by that time had finished dealing with Talaqan, learning of the dispersal of the Sultan's forces, went forth to defeat him and exact vengeance, like flashing lighting or a torrential flood, his heart filled with rage and leading an army more numerous than the raindrops. When the Sultan received tidings of him and heard the report of his advance against him with so great an army that it was impossible to oppose that vengeful host and confront the Emperor of the Earth . . .* he prepared to cross the Indus and ordered boats to be got ready. Orkhan, who was in the rear-guard, took up a stand against the vanguard of the World-Conquering Emperor Chingiz-Khan, but he was defeated and withdrew to join the Sultan.

And when Chingiz-Khan learnt of the Sultan's purpose he hastened forward and overtook him; and his armies hemmed him in before and behind. The next morning when the light of day sprouted upon the cheek of night and the milk of of the dawn gushed forth from the breast of the horizon, the Sultan was left between water and fire - on one side the water of the Indus and on the other an army like consuming fire, nay on the one side he had his heart in the fire and on the other his face towards the water. Nevertheless he did not lose heart but quit himself like a man, preparing for action and kindling the fire of war and battle. And when that lion through donning the garb of combat had become like a panther crouching in readiness to strike off the veil of opponents, he saddled his horse of vengeance and chose to plunge into the fray. The victorious army of the Lord of the Seven Climes attacked the right wing which was commanded by Amin Malik: they were driven back and most of them killed. Amin Malik took to flight and struck out for Peshawar hoping to save his life by the fleetness of his mount. But the Mongols had blocked the roads and he was killed while on his way. The left wing was pushed back also, but the Sultan stood firm in the centre with a body of 700 men and resisted from dawn till noon, charging from left to right and from the left attacking the centre; and with each attack he felled several persons. But the army of Chingiz-Khan continued to advance and their numbers increased hourly, so as to leave the Sultan less and less space to manoeuvre. Seeing that the situation was desperate, with a moist eye and a dry lip he ceased to care for fame and reputation. Akhash Malik, the Sultan's cousin on his mother's side, seized his bridle and drew him back. With a burning heart and a weeping eye the Sultan bade farewell to his children and with the boast . . .* he ordered his led horse to be brought up and mounting it again charged leviathan-like into the sea of calamity. Then, having forced back the Mongol army he turned rein and discarding his cuirass whipped his mount and caused it to leap into the water from a distance of ten ells or more . . .* Seeing him swimming across Chingiz-Khan rode down to the edge of the water. The Mongols made to cast themselves in but he prevented them. They bent their bows, and some who were eye-witnesses have related that so many were killed in the water that as far as their arrows reached the river was red with blood. As for the Sultan, he emerged from the water with a sword, a lance and a shield."

* I'm skipping some poetic interludes. Juvaini is a good read, but at times a good example of why public-servant-types should avoid trying to get too fancy with words.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cheeta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jan-2009 at 13:50
Originally posted by Temujin Temujin wrote:

Originally posted by Omar al Hashim Omar al Hashim wrote:

A few hundred years later Babur captured Delhi and his descendants proceeded to build the Mughal Empire; but I do not consider Babur's empire to have any connection to Genghis's.


but if you considder Temür as Mongol invader then you also have to include Babur.
Taimur belonged to the Birlas tribe of Turks and being his wife from the family of Ghangiz he was titled 'Gorgan' or the son in law. Taimur was the man who made central Asia free of the suzerainty of pagan Mongols. Babur was the great grandson of Taimur and was also of a mother from the family of Ghangiz but Babur did not like Mongols. The Mongols frequently used to attack India so Babur was also named Mughal while he conquerred India. Babur was a brave and energatic man and it was his valour and skill that made him occupy the country with a small force.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cheeta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jan-2009 at 14:00
Originally posted by Temujin Temujin wrote:

the battle of the Indus River where Chinggis defeated Jallal-ud-Din is rather well known.
It was not clearly named the area but it was in the closest area from north, probably it was near Noshehra crossing to Attock in northern Punjab.
The Mongol army was defeated in Parvan province of Afghanistan and was then Muslim army broke. Changiz was in Takhar and hearing hurried to avenge.Turkish army was then fleeing towards India while reaching Indus near,,,, Jalaluddin did try to cross the river with his army with boats. When his mother and other ladies were made to cross the river the boat collapsed and the programme failed. Changiz Khan hearing of the attempt of Sultan crossing the river made a haste and dispatched a section of his army to make him not cross Indus and catch him alive. Jalaluddin being late night for the other day and early the alarm was made that the Mongol army was close at hand. Changiz did try to make the Muslim army drive off from the river surronding it from three sides while there war river on the fourth. Historians say that it was laid a bow like being the river the string. Jalaluddin to have a higher post charged on a mound which was occupied by the Mongols. Mongols were driven back by the charged and Changiz himself ran backwards. Then there was made a bold stand. Jalaluddin was himself seen rushing to the left and right sections of the army. The Mongol army ten thousand in ambush soon approached to the field and the right and left wings of the Turks were destroyed. The Turks seeing certain death made their final stand and the battle continued from early morning till noon. Jalaluddin seeing no hope further changed his exhausted horse and taking away his mail and armour getting a sword in hand jumped into river Indus with only a sword. The women and family of the Sultan were said to be slain and put into the river by the Turks themselves to be not humiliated by Mongols. Mongols saught permission from the Khaqan to chase him swimming but Changiz forbade them.


Edited by Cheeta - 21-Jan-2009 at 14:22
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cheeta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jan-2009 at 14:20
Originally posted by Omar al Hashim Omar al Hashim wrote:

Changhiz Khan had lost his son in Bamyan province of Afghanistan where there was a battle fought between Sultan Jalaluddin and his son Shegi kutuku. The Mongol army was defeated by the allied force of Turks, Persians and Afghans.

 Sir, it was Parvan rightly that I had got confused with Bamyan but the time was of Iltutmush in India.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Feb-2009 at 02:18
Originally posted by Bernard Woolley Bernard Woolley wrote:

 
 
There's more than enough evidence that this happened
 
 
Also,Khan is one of common surnames in India sub-continent.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jallaludin Akbar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Feb-2009 at 02:26
Originally posted by pebbles pebbles wrote:

Originally posted by Bernard Woolley Bernard Woolley wrote:

 
 
There's more than enough evidence that this happened
 
 
Also,Khan is one of common surnames in India sub-continent.
 

Although having Mongol origins, that is more due to the Muslim rulers who adopted the title and used it extensively in the rule over India. You can say that they were influenced by Genghis Khan though...but Genghis Khan and the Khan surname in south asia do not serve much of a direct correlation than it being greatly influence by muslims.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nataraja Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Apr-2009 at 06:34
the great khan in the hunt of the jalauddin did enter india ..but not to conquer

the later chagtai turks attacked the delhi sultans many times... but they were defeated in almost all occasions...

europe was comprehensively defeated. it was only the death of ogdai which saved them from total ruin.
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