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The_Jackal_God View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15-Aug-2007 at 23:15
Mommsen says that the Cimbri requested Rome to assign them land where they might peaceably settle.

He then goes on to say that that was a request that Rome certainly could to grant.

Can someone explain why Rome decided they had to fight them rather than settle them? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kilroy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Aug-2007 at 01:40
If i remember correctly, the Cimbri only offered a land agreement after they broke through the Alps and proceeded into the Po valley.

This was AFTER the Teutones and the Cimbri separated, and after Marius destroyed the Teutones.  The Cimbri sent messengers to Marius requesting Roman land in Italy.  Little did they know that Marius annihilated their allies, they only knew after Marius made a sarcastic remark about the Teutones, "Then donít trouble yourself about your brethren, for they have land, and they will have it forever.Ē  (from Plutrachs the life of Marius).

I think this is what Marius was referring to, but again i have my doubts.  Mommsen should have known Rome would never grant land in Italy.  Which book of his did you read this in?

Actually, come to think of it, perhaps Carbo received this deal way before hand.  Gnaeus Carbo was the first general to meet the Cimbri in battle in Gaul.  He offered them safe passage than ambushed them in a futile attempt  at gaining a glorious victory over the barbarians from the north whom threatened one of Rome's allies.  After that the Cimbri and Romans never really got along.  The Cimbri moved like a mountain down onto Rome's allies and Rome had to respond with force after that. 

Hope this helps.

-Kilroy



Kilroy was here.
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The_Jackal_God View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The_Jackal_God Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Aug-2007 at 11:19
thanks kilroy.

i was just reading it last night.

Mommsen, History of Rome IV (available on Gutenberg.org)

I understand not settling them on land in Italy, and as far as i know, this was before the Teutones entered the picture.

the wording the Mommsen puts in the Cimbri's mouth is "be assigned to land" appearing to me, that the Romans had the opportunity to bulwark one of their frontiers with a powerful allied tribe.

for instance, around this time, they were having trouble in Dalmatia, Hispania, Thrace, and were looking to expand in Gaul.

or, maybe it's they defeated Carbo, then asked to be settled...d'oh, i'ma hafta recheck. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dexippus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Aug-2007 at 14:17

Our main sources for the Cimbri are several brief Epitomes on Livy, and Plutarchs Life of Caius Marius.   The Cimbri may have been seeking land, but then again, they seemed to be having a good time freebooting through Gaul, and indeed the word Cimbri may derive from a term for "freebooter." Their origins are unclear; they may have been displaced by tidal flooding around the Jutland penninsula, as the sources postulate, or they simply may have been a maurading group that snowballed into a wandering army, and roved across Europe grazing off the fruits of hapless Gauls.  Their numbers are no doubt overstated at upwards of 200,000 warriors, probably they consisted of no more than 80,000 adult males--which would provide parity with the Roman armies that defeated them at Aquae Sextiae and Vercellae.  They do, however, represent the first major incursion of Germanic speaking peoples into the Mediterranean basin.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ulrich von hutten Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Aug-2007 at 15:22

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Leonardo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Aug-2007 at 05:20
Originally posted by ulrich von hutten ulrich von hutten wrote:

To your attention....
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote arnspac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 00:42
For those who may still be interested;
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edgewaters Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 01:40

Originally posted by kilroy kilroy wrote:

Actually, come to think of it, perhaps Carbo received this deal way before hand.  Gnaeus Carbo was the first general to meet the Cimbri in battle in Gaul.  He offered them safe passage than ambushed them in a futile attempt  at gaining a glorious victory over the barbarians from the north whom threatened one of Rome's allies.  After that the Cimbri and Romans never really got along.  The Cimbri moved like a mountain down onto Rome's allies and Rome had to respond with force after that.

The Cimbri were already coming down on one of Rome's most important client states, Noricum. That's why Carbo was dispatched with such a large force.

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