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Forum LockedArmenian Kara-hunj & Scottish Stone-henge

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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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    Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 23:23

Lets first read it: http://www.huliq.com/56596/stonehenge-england-3500-years-younger-armenian-karahunj

Stonehenge England is 3,500 Years Younger than Armenian Karahunj

Tourists familiar with Scottish heritage would be astonished to discover the possibility of famous Stonehenge been originated in Armenia, claiming the fact that the Armenian land is the real cradle of civilization.
Famous professor and world’s known specialist on stone monuments Gerald. S. Hawkins had acknowledged that Karahunj is 7,500 years old, which means that it is 3,500 years older than Scotland Stonehenge, older than Karnak in France and Newgrenge in Ireland. It may prove what some people already suspect that Armenia is the cradle of the civilization.
On the territory of 7 hectares, 223 huge vertical stones like soldiers stand on the hill, some with holes pierced in them. The rough- cut stones aligned irregularly for a purpose, 84 were found to have holes. Many unique astronomic instruments consisting of one, two or three Stones were identified and using these, many observations of the Sun, Moon and stars. It is commonly assumed to be an early observatory, the evidence of ancient astronomical culture in Armenia. These stones have been attributed with mystical and cosmic powers. The Armenian scientists in ancient times could accurately measure latitude, knew that the Earth was ball-shaped, had an accurate calendar, and many more.

More about Cara-hunge (Karahunj): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zorats_Karer

A nearby village, named Karahunj, takes the official name for the site, which has a compound meaning: "Kar" in Armenian means Stone, while "hunj" means either singing or bouquet. Interestingly, Stonehenge is also a compound world, and 'henge' has no English root. Heruni's team noted the similarity between the translation of Karahunj and Stonehenge, and also that between Callanish (Old Brittany "Caranish" which in Armenian is exactly translated as 'Stone Sign').

An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

Hanjar:
 
Hanjâr "a straight road; way, rule, law; habit, custom; conduct; a mason's rule, a plumb-line, a level;" Mid.Pers. hanjâr "right, correct;" from Proto-Iranian *ham-cara-, *han-cara- prefixed *cara- "to move, walk" (cf. Av. car- "to move, go, walk," carāni "I would go," carāt "he would go;" Mod.Pers. caridan "to graze," gozârdan "to explain," gozâreš "explanation"); cf. Skt. samcara- "passage, way, road, path; going about, moving," from prefix sam- + cara- "moving, going, walking;" Gk. pelomai "to move;" L. colere "to till, cultivate, inhabit."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2009 at 23:40
The writer of the article seems more interested in masterbating with Armenian flag in his other hand than informing the reader of anything useful or correct. Few people on earth think stonehenge is in scotland. The site itself is not a circle and the world is full of megalithic sites some stretching back to 12,000 years ago way way way older than stonehenge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2009 at 09:44
I'm talking about the words, English Stonehenge, Armenian Carahunge and Scottish Calanais/Caranish, it seems they have all a common origin which could be not too old.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ArmenianSurvival Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2009 at 10:39
The article is from a tourist agency, so lets not dwell over it. There are much more detailed articles on this subject, written by doctors in their respective fields, with the most detailed analysis and sources in Armenian and Russian.
 
But Paul, flag-jerking aside, it is hypothesized (of course backed up with a certain amount of evidence) that the Armenian Highlands were one of the oldest, if not the oldest, site of civilization and complex societies on the planet. It is even hypothesized by many linguists that the Indo-European language originated from the Armenian Highland. There have been excavations of cities which housed complex societies that are over 7,000 years old such as Metsamor, which also includes one of the oldest iron and bronze industries in the world. At the current pace, archaeologists in Armenia are making ground-breaking discoveries literally every few months, the most recent being the discovery of a 7,000 year-old human brain and a 5,000 year-old Aryan burial ground (btw western historiography's theory is that Aryans appeared on the Armenian Highland less than 3,000 years ago, so history is being rewritten with every new discovery). Karahunj's dating was confirmed by the world's foremost experts in megalithic study, who also confirmed that the site was used as an observatory. And remember, the modern Armenian republic is just a tiny fraction of the Armenian Highland, and it still yields all these clues about the past. The theories I stated earlier are not conclusive (as if anything in history really is), and you can argue that there were older regions with cities housing complex societies. But the discoveries already made (which are much more numerous than those I named) and that will continue to be made, will put Armenia as one of the regions talked about when discussing ancient centers of civilization. For this reason, don't be surprised if many people refer to it in the same way that many in western acadamia refer to Mesopotamia as one of the oldest sites of civilization.
 
Sadly, there are only scant resources on these expansive fields in the English language. The vast majority of this stuff is not only new to western academia, but as I said earlier, most of the sources and analyses are in the Armenian and Russian languages.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slayertplsko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Apr-2009 at 21:43

Originally posted by Cyrus Shahmiri Cyrus Shahmiri wrote:

A nearby village, named Karahunj, takes the official name for the site, which has a compound meaning: "Kar" in Armenian means Stone, while "hunj" means either singing or bouquet. Interestingly, Stonehenge is also a compound world, and 'henge' has no English root. Heruni's team noted the similarity between the translation of Karahunj and Stonehenge, and also that between Callanish (Old Brittany "Caranish" which in Armenian is exactly translated as 'Stone Sign').

First off, I would be careful with statements like ''has no English root''. The root of ''hang'' is usually considered in this instance.

Secondly, there is some similarity between Armenian and Gaelic words for stone, but that is because they come from a common root:

Proto-IE: *kar- (kh-)
Meaning: stone, thorn; hard, rough
Tokharian: A tsär `rauh'
Old Indian: khára- `hard, harsh, rough, sharp'
Other Iranian: NPers xār, xārā 'Fels, Dorn'
Armenian: khar `Stein, Fels'
Old Greek: krănăó- 'rocky, rugged (in Hom. always in Ithaka); hard; stinging'; kárkharo- `beissend, bissig, scharf, rauh'
Celtic: OIr carrac f., OCymr carrec `Fels, Stein'

Then, the semantic similarity is just that all three have something to do with stones - what's so surprising about that?? They're stones. The Armenian stones sing, the Scottish are a stone sign and the English hang.

Quote Hanjâr "a straight road; way, rule, law; habit, custom; conduct; a mason's rule, a plumb-line, a level;" Mid.Pers. hanjâr "right, correct;" from Proto-Iranian *ham-cara-, *han-cara- prefixed *cara- "to move, walk"

Again, phonetically similar words, but with different meanings.

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