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Forum Locked100 Interesting facts about the Hellenistic World

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    Posted: 21-Nov-2007 at 23:10
On this forum we have lots of post like 10 best and so on...... On another forum I'm on they do the non-comparative 100 interesting facts about. It works well. So I thought I'd see if it works on this forum.... I'll start.
 
1. The ancient Greeks excavated Dinasaurs and exibited their fossils on display in temples for the public to see.
 
2. There were three battles of Thermopolae not one. Each ended the same, with the defenders outflanked by the enemy using the same path.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dexippus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Nov-2007 at 11:51
3) Cleopatra VII, the last of the Ptolemies, was also the first to learn to speak Egyptian.

4) A Roman embassy raised Antiochus IV's siege of Alexandria by drawing a circle around him and telling him not to step out until he had decided to withdraw.

5) Cassander could not pass a statue of Alexander without shuddering from fear, so greatly had Alexander intimidated him while alive.

6) The Hellenistic period saw the introduction of war elephants into the west. Seleucus had the largest herd, supposedly numbering 500.

7) War elephants deployed by Pyrrhus in Italy were supposedly frightened away by a herd of pigs. A coin with a pig was minted in Rome to commemorate the event.

8) Poor Pyrrhus was killed campaigning in Argos after an old lady hit him in the head with a roof tile.

9) Alexander razed Thebes to the ground, but spared the home of the Boeotian poet Pindar.

10) Ptolemy II married his full sister Arsinoe, adopting the Egyptian practice of royal incest. Greek inhabitants of Alexandria were scandalized. He therefore acquired the name "Philadelphos"--sibling lover









Edited by dexippus - 23-Nov-2007 at 17:49
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cadmus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Nov-2007 at 14:06
Pyyrhus did not die due to the roof tile , but was dazed when it hit his head , and subsequently a enemy soldier took advantage of Pyrrhus his state and killed him ...
The Enchelians a forgotten Hellenic tribe
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Nov-2007 at 20:23
Originally posted by Paul Paul wrote:

 
1. The ancient Greeks excavated Dinasaurs and exibited their fossils on display in temples for the public to see.
 


Paul is this a joke or something i've never heard of? If it is true i have to say you've surprised me like noone has done lately. Shocked


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Nov-2007 at 20:30
11) Alexander the Great and Diogenes meet in Corinth. Alexander asks him if he can do any favour for him and Diogenes replied "Yes, please stand out from my sunlight". Alexander replied "If I was not Alexander, I would like to be Diogenes".

12) Koine Greek, an extention of Attic, is being introduced as an official writting language.




Edited by Flipper - 22-Nov-2007 at 20:38


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dexippus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Nov-2007 at 12:29
13: Khandahar Afghanistan is one of the many Alexandarias--the city's name itself is a botched pronunciation. Al Iskandaria in Iraq is another such Alexandria that has retained the name to this day.
 
14. The Roman name Atticus is first attested in 147 BC, evidence of growing Philhellenism in Rome.
 
15. The mummified body of Alexander the Great, in a massive glass and gold coffin, was intercepted by Ptolemy on its way back to Macedonia, and subsequently put on display in Alexandria. 
 
16. Diadochoi, as they assumed the diadem, began to self-consciously imitate Alexander's mannerisms, even cocking their head to the left, mimicing a trait that may have been caused in Alexander by a mild birth defect. As Alexander went clean shaven, his successors started shaving, even into old age, and the clean shaven face became a new fashion across the Mediterranean.
 
17: Sparta saw a dramatic revival of military power in the 3rd century under the reformer king Kleomenes. By redistributions of land he increased the number of eligable Sparatans (homioi), and revived (or more accurately re-invented) the institutions of the mess and agoge. With his new army he badly battered the Achean League, but was defeated when its general Aratus reluctantly sought the aid of Macedon, whose forces were decisive at the battle of Sallasia in 222 BC.
 
18. The price Aratus paid for the Macedonian alliance was the Arco-Corinth, one of the "fetters of Greece," which he turned over to a Macedonian garrison.
 
19. "Freedom for the Greeks" was a slogan used by all the Hellenistic kings, promising liberty (elutheria) to the Greek city states. When Rome defeated Phillip V in the 2nd Macedonian war, her general Flamininus, proceeded to preside over the Ishmian games, where, appropriating a long tradition of sloganeering, he dramatically promised "freedom for the Greeks."
 
 
 
 
 


Edited by dexippus - 23-Nov-2007 at 12:59
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Nov-2007 at 17:25
Originally posted by dexippus dexippus wrote:

 
19. "Freedom for the Greeks" was a slogan used by all the Hellenistic kings, promising liberty (elutheria) to the Greek city states. When Rome defeated Phillip V in the 2nd Macedonian war, her general Flamininus, proceeded to preside over the Ishmian games, where, appropriating a long tradition of sloganeering, he dramatically promised "freedom for the Greeks." 


Dexippus was this reported by Diodorus or am I wrong?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Nov-2007 at 20:48
Originally posted by Flipper Flipper wrote:

Originally posted by Paul Paul wrote:

 
1. The ancient Greeks excavated Dinasaurs and exibited their fossils on display in temples for the public to see.
 


Paul is this a joke or something i've never heard of? If it is true i have to say you've surprised me like noone has done lately. Shocked
 
It was on a discovery channel show on dinasaurs, revealing the true  history of paleontology. Displacing the urban legend about people finding them and thinking they were dragons.


Edited by Paul - 23-Nov-2007 at 20:49
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dexippus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 12:55
20: The Hellenistic era saw grotesque art come into high fashion. Sculptural depictions of drunken, toothless women, hermaphrodites, masturbating hunchbacks and winged phalli are some of the unusual pieces of art that have survived from this era.

21: It was also an era in which genteel literature flourished. The Comedy of Manners was virtually invented by Menander, whose "New Comedy" replaced the politically charged raunchiness of Aristophenes. The Alexandrian poet Theocrites, meanwhile, developed forms of pastoral poetry that would heavily influence Virgil and Horace, and European writers for the next 2000 years.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dexippus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 13:03
23: One of the forms of Greek culture spread far and wide was the institution of the gymnasium, a place for the mental and physical education of young men--epheboi. The gymnasium was highly popular, but one aspect proved controversial: naked exercise, and the homoerotic atmosphere it created (although gymnasia strictly forbade pederasty). In Jerusalem, the opening of a gymnasium in the 170s lead to massive unrest, and contributed to the tensions that erupted into revolt in 168. In Rome, Scipio Africanus was heavily criticized when it was reported that he exercised in a Sicilian gymnasium wearing only a cloak.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Petro Invictus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 15:08
24.The Ancient Macedonians spoke a form of a pre-Slavic language! Take the Rosetta stone middle text for reference!
25. The Roman exodus of Macedonians north across the Danube caused the creation of the proto-Slavic tribes,who returned to the Balkans after the Hun invasion.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Petro Invictus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 15:10
26. Koine Greek was not the langauge of the common people. It was rather the language of the elite, and the administration. An Esperanto of the ancient time. It was influenced by more than 40 languages (lexiacally and syntactically).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 15:46
Originally posted by Petro Invictus Petro Invictus wrote:


25. The Roman exodus of Macedonians north across the Danube caused the creation of the proto-Slavic tribes,who returned to the Balkans after the Hun invasion.


LOL

Yeah I know the latest theory...The Slavs went to Siberia and then returned again to the balkans. Clap








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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 15:50
Originally posted by Petro Invictus Petro Invictus wrote:

It was influenced by more than 40 languages (lexiacally and syntactically).


Oh really? Do you know how to read Koine and make that assumption? Why do I think it is simplyfied Attic? From the Ionian dialect to Koine the development seems to be very very natural. At least for people who read classical and archaic Greek.

Furthermore, why was Koine used in theatrical works that common people attended if as you say it was only for the elite? Why did the non native speakers make breathing mistakes in Koine writtings (e.g Syria) while Macedonians and the rest of the Hellenes didn't?

Petro, this is a history forum, not a pan-slavism gathering point.


Edited by Flipper - 24-Nov-2007 at 16:26


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Athanasios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 22:02
Ok,let's continue from number 23 and so on...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Aster Thrax Eupator Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Nov-2007 at 22:47

1- The Hellenistic world directly influenced the philosophy of Buddhist and some aspects of modern indian culture

2- the word "parchment" comes from english and italian corruptions for the word Pergamum - the capital of one of the smaller Diodochi states which was famed for it's huge library, friendliness to Rome and intellectual wealth
 
3- one of the ancient world's largest ever pieces of siege equipment was used by a Hellenistic general - Demetrius, son of Antigonus the one-eyed. The "Agepolis" was a vast construction which stood more than 10 stories high and could mount multiple siege weapons
 
4- Decendents of the priests of the Didymaion temple in Ionia live in Afghanistian
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chilbudios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Nov-2007 at 00:35
"parchment" is not an English or Italian corruption of the word "Pergamum". At first, it was a derivation in Ancient Greek and Latin, a word meaning "of Pergamum" (Pergamon -> pergamenos/on/a, brought into Latin as pergamenus/um/a). From this one (possibly influenced by "Parthica pellis"  - Parthian skin - also known as "parche", "parge") eventually a term "parchemin" was developed which became today, in English, "parchement".
 
 
Some accounts from Plutarch lives must be taken cum grano salis. Plutarch is the one who mentions a single episode (by hearsay, as he confesses) with Cassander shuddering while seeing a statue of Alexander in Delphi. The death of Pyrrhus is told by Plutarch as Cadmus described it, however Pausanias writes that Pyrrhus died from that tile's blow. The latter account also brings also an obviously mythical dimension. The Argives said that Demeter, the goddess, it was actually the one who hit him and they had a sanctuary for her built in the place where that battle took place. 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Nov-2007 at 00:41
Originally posted by Paul Paul wrote:

 
It was on a discovery channel show on dinasaurs, revealing the true  history of paleontology. Displacing the urban legend about people finding them and thinking they were dragons.


Damn, If i only knew where they found that account. It sounds surreal or even funny. LOL

In any case you gave me some homework. Smile


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Aster Thrax Eupator Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Nov-2007 at 01:24
Quote Some accounts from Plutarch lives must be taken cum grano salis. Plutarch is the one who mentions a single episode (by hearsay, as he confesses) with Cassander shuddering while seeing a statue of Alexander in Delphi. The death of Pyrrhus is told by Plutarch as Cadmus described it, however Pausanias writes that Pyrrhus died from that tile's blow. The latter account also brings also an obviously mythical dimension. The Argives said that Demeter, the goddess, it was actually the one who hit him and they had a sanctuary for her built in the place where that battle took place. 
 
The legend would seem to agree with the Diodochi obsession with seemingly trying to impersonate the homeric hero and Alexander - Pyhrus would almost certainly have not actually have fought in the siege - that would have been foolish for so good a commander and thoughtful a man.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Nov-2007 at 12:31
According to a Osprey book about Greek hoplites, most of the surviving records regarding the military service system came from either Athens or from Xenophon.
 
It stated that conscripts underwent basic training in gymnasiums and then had to perform a year's garrison duty at the age of 17. Curiously, many younger conscripts were "adopted" by an older, more experienced hoplite to form a pair that contemporary sources named as "lovers".
 
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